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Well what I have been doing is running it very hard for the last couple of days....
And it’s made a big improvement.
It’s getting better. Today I pounded it fairly hard. Wide open starts, a few burn outs ect

It started to rev more freely and felt like it was pulling a lot harder as it hit 3k.

I pick the trailer up Thursday and bring it home and then i take it 300km for 2 days then back home.

4300 lbs dry. Add 40g water, generator, food, clothes, propane, batteries, prob at 5200.
Not sure I would reccomend that or even technically explain using conventional physics how it's supposed to effective.
 

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Not sure I would reccomend that or even technically explain using conventional physics how it's supposed to effective.
Loading a new engine is a very common way of breaking it in. Increased cylinder pressure helps seat piston rings.
 

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Discussion Starter #24
Update to this post

I did a hard break-in on my truck. And although I have read a lot about seating the rings early. I still find there is a lot of blow by.
I have pulled my trailer a lot, many thousands of miles. And it does very well.
I have also pulled the company’s dual axle dump trailer loaded with fire wood. I also had the bed of the truck loaded. Not sure what it weighed but it felt very heavy.

The truck pulls very hard to 3500 rpm now and then it shifts gears...
I do wish there was more power for quick passing . Sometimes you just can’t pass because of short passing zones or oncoming traffic.

So far no regrets it’s very impressive truck.

Rob
 

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Update to this post

I did a hard break-in on my truck. And although I have read a lot about seating the rings early. I still find there is a lot of blow by.
I have pulled my trailer a lot, many thousands of miles. And it does very well.
I have also pulled the company’s dual axle dump trailer loaded with fire wood. I also had the bed of the truck loaded. Not sure what it weighed but it felt very heavy.

The truck pulls very hard to 3500 rpm now and then it shifts gears...
I do wish there was more power for quick passing . Sometimes you just can’t pass because of short passing zones or oncoming traffic.

So far no regrets it’s very impressive truck.

Rob

Do you use any oil? FYI, I did the recommended break in on our 2018 Z71 CCLB, dutifully. Now (~42K miles, 1/2 with a GCVW of over 10K#) I used ~1/3 quart after ~6K miles of heavy highway towing at 55-60 m/h. Not bragging or commiserating, just adding one data point.

I agree about being impressed, and no regrets...
 

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Discussion Starter #26
Do you use any oil? FYI, I did the recommended break in on our 2018 Z71 CCLB, dutifully. Now (~42K miles, 1/2 with a GCVW of over 10K#) I used ~1/3 quart after ~6K miles of heavy highway towing at 55-60 m/h. Not bragging or commiserating, just adding one data point.

I agree about being impressed, and no regrets...
I been keeping a close watch on the oil level. And it doesn’t seem to be using any oil.
last oil change I filled it to the full mark. I just checked it at 2500 miles and it is still at the full mark. I find that interesting considering how much oil mist comes out of the oil fill cap when i remove it with the engine running. I would think that much mist would add up to some oil being pushed out the crankcase ventilation....

Now to be fair I don’t follow the MFG recommended oil change intervals. I do 3-4K oil changes. At 3 to 4k the dic says oil life is around 50%
i have read so many nightmares about cam chain failures being blamed on extended oil change intervals. I know we have a belt. But there is a lot of proof out there that shows as oil ages it is unable to protect the cam chain. Other engine parts don’t show the wear caused by extended oil changes, at least not as fast as the chain....
GM put out a recall about cam chain wear caused by extended oil change intervals.
The recall was to update the ECM with a new algorithm to decide when to change the oil.
That tells me a lot about how long oil really lasts.

And keep in mind that MFGs today like to use cost of ownership (as in oil changes) as part of there selling feature. They know that in real world tests the results show a rusted out pile of shiit with a good working motor. So why not extend the oil change.

Not a good thing for me as I am very aggressive with my vehicles. But on the other hand I am very aggressive with maintenance too. I changed diff, transfer case and transmission fluids at 10,000 miles. Amsoil..........
I am getting ready to do a motor flush. I bought some semi synth Rotella that I will run for approx 500 miles then dump and go back to Dexos 2 with a new filter...
The last oil change I did I let the truck idle for 3 or 4 min. Checked the oil and it was as black looking as the oil that was in there for 3000 miles. That means there was a lot of dirty oil still in the motor. And as research has proven soot is abrasive. I will do the flush once a year.

My company Ford Transit with the 2.5 sees wide open starts from red lights and red line multiple times a day. I can’t believe it doesn’t use any oil. Or hasn’t blown up yet....
I am a believer in the best oil you can get and not leaving oil in to long.........

At 61 my motorcycles and ATV also see very hard running too
Rob
 

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I just did my first long pull with my truck. It's tuned and deleted. I pulled 650 miles with the bed loaded and pulling a 1980 c10 on a 18' car hauler. All I can say is wow. Granted I stayed at 65mph but it preformed perfectly. I am lifted 6" and running 33x12.50's and still got 18 miles per gallon. My old 5.3 Sierra would have been lucky to get 8. I'm very impressed.
 

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The method I have always used to break in my bikes and cars is to very the load and RPM without going to extremes. Don't lug it, don't redline it.

I did a fly and buy to get my Canyon. It went 840 miles on I-70 in cool weather (around 45F) and into a stiff quartering wind much of the time as a storm system was coming in. Learned about hood flutter at that point! I did some roll ons followed by coast downs to seat and cool the rings, but mostly the tach sat at 2,000 RPM going 80 mph, with the load varied by the terrain.

The truck is at 40K now, uses no measurable oil. I would say it got a long moderate break in. Supposedly manufacturers have tighter tolerances and better quality control, as most people do not think to "break in" their cars and they do fine. I think just drive it normally - don't baby it, don't unduly stress it, just drive it and don't overthink too much, change the oil early if you like, might be a waste, but it can't hurt.

In general, our 2.8s just love to run between 1,600 and 2,200 RPM depending on how much power one needs at the time. I let mine live right around 1,800 RPM 99.999% of it's day to day driving life. When put to work, the 2.8 just loves to run at it's 2K torque peak, pulling a load. A buddy has a Ford with the 6.7. That big engine is a comparatively revvy (and power laden) thing. The 2.8 is not as revvy and more chill than the big Ford is.

Have seen the TFL "Ike Gauntlet" videos where the floorboard and rev diesels up to 3.5K or more while going up that hill. That is simply not the correct way to drive a diesel :LOL:
 
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Discussion Starter #29
The method I have always used to break in my bikes and cars is to very the load and RPM without going to extremes. Don't lug it, don't redline it.

I did a fly and buy to get my Canyon. It went 840 miles on I-70 in cool weather (around 45F) and into a stiff quartering wind much of the time as a storm system was coming in. Learned about hood flutter at that point! I did some roll ons followed by coast downs to seat and cool the rings, but mostly the tach sat at 2,000 RPM going 80 mph, with the load varied by the terrain.

The truck is at 40K now, uses no measurable oil. I would say it got a long moderate break in. Supposedly manufacturers have tighter tolerances and better quality control, as most people do not think to "break in" their cars and they do fine. I think just drive it normally - don't baby it, don't unduly stress it, just drive it and don't overthink too much, change the oil early if you like, might be a waste, but it can't hurt.

In general, our 2.8s just love to run between 1,600 and 2,200 RPM depending on how much power one needs at the time. I let mine live right around 1,800 RPM 99.999% of it's day to day driving life. When put to work, the 2.8 just loves to run at it's 2K torque peak, pulling a load. A buddy has a Ford with the 6.7. That big engine is a comparatively revvy (and power laden) thing. The 2.8 is not as revvy and more chill than the big Ford is.

Have seen the TFL "Ike Gauntlet" videos where the floorboard and rev diesels up to 3.5K or more while going up that hill. That is simply not the correct way to drive a diesel :LOL:
FLT was very hard on that truck. I bet the EGTs where threw the roof.
Problem with diesels is that there is a very short window to inject fuel into the cylinder. That’s why they don’t rev very high. It can be done with oversized injectors that can get a large amount of fuel in the cyl in a short amount of time but keeping the fuel atomized will involve a bigger injector pump.

I cringe watching some of there videos where they run gas engines just below red line all the way up the mountain. I expect to see a rod thrown caused by a spun rod bearing.

Rob
 

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I did a run out in the countryside to play with my obd2 and obd2fusion app. At 70mph on a flat grade rpm's were ~1850ish. I'm running 265 55 17's, same size that was part of the Trail Boss Package. I always get crap from the tire guys: "That's not what the sticker says!" blah, blah, blah.
 
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