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Changed out brake pads today. Old ones weren’t as bad as I thought they were. But, they had 91.5k miles on them and it felt like it was taking more pedal to slow you down/ took longer to slow. So I changed them out with Wagner ThermoQuiet Ceramic pads.

Perhaps I should have changed out the rotors instead, or as well. They looked good though so 🤷‍♂️ Also had plenty of fluid in the reservoir. Truck stops better now so I guess I’ll leave it at that.

Also, changing the front pads is so much more simple than the rear pads. Wish they had that caliper design all the way around.
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Good mileage on those pads. I changed mine at 150000. ( 180 miles a day all highway). I switched to the power stop pads and rotors. I had one front rotor that was warped. And I am planning to do some moderate towing I'm the future.
 

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The pads still looked quite good. Really good service for that kind of mileage. Any grooving in the rotors at all?

My attitude with rotors is I run 'em unless they are warped. The minimum thickness spec on the rotor is a "stacked" spec with the pads - if the rotor is less than minimum thickness and the pads are at minimum thickness, the pistons in the calipers can potentially over extend and fail. The solution for cheapskates with thin but not warped rotors is to change their pads early so the total "stacked" spec is within parameters.

Be that as it may, my kid's Kia's rotors, after 140K miles, measure at their minimum thickness spec. I got new ones for $61 each and pads for $55 or so, then got a $45 discount, so the whole shebang was about $125. Damn, that is cheap :cool:
 

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The pads still looked quite good. Really good service for that kind of mileage. Any grooving in the rotors at all?

My attitude with rotors is I run 'em unless they are warped. The minimum thickness spec on the rotor is a "stacked" spec with the pads - if the rotor is less than minimum thickness and the pads are at minimum thickness, the pistons in the calipers can potentially over extend and fail. The solution for cheapskates with thin but not warped rotors is to change their pads early so the total "stacked" spec is within parameters.

Be that as it may, my kid's Kia's rotors, after 140K miles, measure at their minimum thickness spec. I got new ones for $61 each and pads for $55 or so, then got a $45 discount, so the whole shebang was about $125. Damn, that is cheap :cool:
No grooving that I could really see. I'll check them again and get a thickness on them next time I rotate the tires. Do you know what the minimum thickness of the rotors is by chance?
 

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Generally around 25mm, or basically 1" thick for the rotors, 3/32" for the pads. If there is no grooving, there probably is very little wear on the rotors. There usually is a little "bridge" at the outer edge of the rotor where the pad does not sweep on worn rotors.

Familiar with that, as my kid's Kia rotors are completely smoked :LOL: Interesting they are warp free though.
 
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