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Just got off the phone with Chevrolet Customer Service after barely squeaking my 3 year old, $38K truck through my state's emissions inspection and figured I'd share this story for anyone else thinking of buying one of these things. I had nothing but great experiences with this truck while it was under warranty and love the motor dearly, but the below issue is likely going to be the end of this truck and could end up putting me in the tough position. I was betting on getting somewhere near my money's worth out of the car, and it's looking like it was a mistake for me to bet on this truck.

If you are considering purchasing one of these vehicles, I recommend reading below. If your situation matches mine, really think about why you wouldn't go buy a Tacoma and forget these trucks exist.

So, flash back to 6/2016, my '98 Chevy Blazer finally becomes too much, needing brakes, front end work, having ignition issues. I'm from a GM family, my family always bought cars new, drove + maintained them for 10-20 years, then sold them at scrap value. After getting a good couple of years out of the Blazer, I am looking for a car/truck/go-kart that will do 30MPG, actually carry 4 adults, and carry a bike rack for 4 bikes. I'm making OK money, but looking to buy a house in a couple of years, so I'm OK spending a little on a vehicle, but need something that isn't going to randomly crap out on me and that I can expect to be able to drive for some time.

I end up settling on the Colorado Diesel, because I'm thinking it will be a reliable vehicle that will deliver over 30MPG empty, but also allow me to transport 4 adults and haul mountain bikes, bonus points for having cargo space to work on the house and having torque numbers that will make it enjoyable to drive on the highway. The expectation is reasonable reliability in the long run, with some typical GM awfulness that I can fix in my driveway.

So, all in all, car delivers on promise. At ~20K miles I get a code (P24B0 or P24B1, I can't remember exactly) and start seeing others with issues, a recall, and some technical service bulletins about faulty diesel particulate matter sensors. I take the truck into the dealer, they put on a new sensor, light goes away. I am cool with this, don't think much of it. 1 bad sensor is no big deal, so if 1 trip to the dealer is all I need, great!?

Fast forward to 35.9K miles (warranty expires at 36K) and the same code from 20K is back, and I am close to the expiration of my warranty. I take it into the dealer after reading about some software fixes...and they totally botch the diagnosis of it. Tell me something might be wrong with the Evap system, reset codes, tell me to bring it back if the issue comes up again. Well, I'm a handful of miles from warranty expiring when I leave the dealer and sure enough, the issue comes back the next day driving to work. Now I am out of warranty. Bring it back to the dealer and they make it out like they are doing me a favor for not charging me to look at the issue...but they say they reprogrammed the ECM and send me on my way.

At this point I am nervous, but still not thinking much. There is excessive material out there suggesting that GM knows this is an issue. I have heard there's multiple versions of these sensors and there's multiple software fixes. My thought is that this is a known fault in workmanship of the vehicle, the dealer has already attempted to fix this issue, so I am in the clear if the issue continues.

Fast forward to 42K miles and the light comes back on. Truck is a month over 3 years old, warranty is expired, and I am in the escrow stage of buying my first home (IE: Committed to the deal, have very little $$), using the vehicle to commute, and due for my state emissions test. In my state, the vehicle is basically useless if it fails emissions. I do my usual ritual of scanning codes before taking it to the dealer, and it's a P24B1. I breathe a small sigh of relief, but also am rolling my eyes. I have a good feeling that Chevy will assist, but also know that I will have to go play along with the service writer's "we're doing you a favor by fixing the sh*t we didn't fix the first time around". I take it into the dealer, tell them it's the same code and that I expect them to look into it for me as follow up on the warranty work. Dealer makes a big stink about it, says that they will "try" and that there might be a diagnosis fee. I am livid, but not making a scene. I make it clear that I know the code, and expect the work to be covered.

I wait around for an hour or two, the mechanic comes out and I overhear him tell the service writer that they reprogrammed the ECM, but the issue wasn't present at the time of the issue. Needless to say, I am a little concerned, because the literature suggests that the sensor in question is used during conditions that occur intermittently. The system needs to be at a certain temp and a whole bunch of other things. So, of course, it is an intermittent issue, and it is starting to sound a lot like the 35.9K visit and I am genuinely concerned.

I go out to start the vehicle in the dealer's lot, on a 90 degree F day, and it says "ice possible, drive with care" - having never seen this before, I ask the dealer to take a look. Takes them an hour to find someone that knows enough to tell me that it's because of the ECM flash, and I just need to get it up to speed so the temperature sensor can get some fresh air. Having never seen that before, I am wondering if the prior ECM flash was actually performed?

Anyways, writing that off, I drive off the dealer's lot relieved to feel that this issue might be done with. I need to put some miles on before taking it through emissions, so I take it for a trip up to Maine from Boston, MA. Straight up 95, I let it run in steady state for a couple hundred miles to make sure everything is happy before taking it home and through inspection.

Heading home, light comes back on. It's 4 days before the end of July and I need to get inspected. I say to myself, "F this, I'm going to buy the sensor off Rock Auto, replace it, and be on my way". Get home, start looking for the sensor...can't find it anywhere. Now, I am nervous. I don't want to take it into the dealer and risk having to pay for a diagnosis, when they have a track record of failing to diagnose this issue already. Can't buy the part online. Can't afford a new car. Don't want to buy the sensor from a dealer, because don't want them to use me as an excuse in any future effort to get help.

I call Chevy customer support, hoping to get some help with my dealer. My thought, at this point, is that the issue is with my Dealer. I tell them the above history, tell them I'm cool with the fact that the car has an issue, but I need some support from them in getting me the service I need. They tell me they need to send it to a "senior" blah blah blah and I should hear back in 2 business days. Thankfully, 3 days later, the light goes off for a hundred or so miles and I swing it into the local inspection station and it passes. This was the 30th of July. Fast forward to today, 5 days after my original call, and I get some useless Chevy rep on the phone saying that my vehicle is out of warranty and they can't help. I made sure she understood that the issue started right off the lot. I made sure that she knew that all I wanted was some help dealing with my dealer.

So, I know the 369 ft-lbs of torque and awesome ride and this and that are peaking your fancy, but really think about whether you want to be in my shoes in 3 years. I'm sure a couple of folks will reply below saying "I haven't had any issues" or whatever, and you will tell yourself "the likelihood of this happening to me is so small", but stop, think about it. Do you really think this thing is going to have the same level of reliability as it's competitors? You could walk over to a Toyota dealer and drop asking on an mid-spec Tacoma and likely never have to see them again for out-of-warranty repairs. You could buy a f*cking Honda Ridgeline to move your lawn clippings on Sundays and burn 10K in dollar bills in your driveway.

Think about it.

-Max.

PS: Photos of my truck attached lest folks accuse me of being a Toyota/Honda shill.
 

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Of the stories I’ve heard of people who have had issues with their trucks, it usually also seems like they have terrible service from their dealers who have no idea what they’re doing. Praise God that I have had no reason to take my truck in to the dealer for work, aside from body work from a fender bender.

I’m sorry to hear about your incident. Can’t say I would blame you if I had the same issues with my truck. Never had any problems with 2017 to 45k miles when it was stock. Thankfully my state doesn’t have emissions testing in most counties aside from those with big cities. I deleted and have had no issues since. Just got back from a 2800 mile trip and am now over 70k miles.

I know it’s extra money for a tune and exhaust and it kills the warranty, but I think it’s worth it for reliability, IF you like the truck and IF you live in a place that you can tune and delete. If not, something with a gas engine is probably a better option.

Sorry for your loss again.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I know it’s extra money for a tune and exhaust and it kills the warranty, but I think it’s worth it for reliability, IF you like the truck and IF you live in a place that you can tune and delete. If not, something with a gas engine is probably a better option.
Yea, I'm in MA so I don't think tuning or deleting are options for me. I definitely was not expecting that tuning or deleting would be required for reliability. It's a shame that consumers are ultimately held responsible for this stuff, while manufacturers have no concrete responsibility at all to produce cars that pass emissions reliably. I am definitely laughing at myself for shrugging off all the folks that (I thought) were deleting/tuning for performance.
 

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I mean I did it for in part for performance and fuel economy. But also for reliability. I went in to it knowing that at some point in time the DPF is going to plug up, the CAT is going to plug up and the EGR is going to plug up, because that's just how they are. Then you have to pay to fix/ replace those and they will no doubt be out of warranty when it happens. My 2004 Silverado Duramax had the EGR start to get plugged up. It was very doggy. I got rid of it and it ran like new. We had 2 of our company trucks that are a 2000 and 2003 F-350's with the 7.3 Powerstroke with only a CAT on them and they both plugged up. Didn't have to tune those trucks to get rid of it. Just cut the pipe off, took a railroad bar to the inside of the CAT and knocked all the guts out and welded the pipe back on and both of those trucks run better than new.

Diesel's put out black smoke which people don't like and isn't good. But diesels just don't run good when you limit them. There is no way to make them truly reliable unless you get rid of the emissions equipment.
 

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Dear Nescio, thanks for sharing your story and experience that I wish if I read it before November 2017. I bought my 2017 Colorado 2.8 Duramax Z71 from a dealer in MD brand new costing me over 40k. I really like it, I drove it for around 3 months (barely 2000 Miles) in the US. Then due to my job I had to relocate overseas and I had to take the beautiful truck with me to North Africa. First week I had warnings regarding the quality of emissions. In the absence of proper qualified dealers the truck is immobilized as the engine is turning max at 6 Miles/h until I fix the emissions issue. As no regulations on emissions where I am now, my technician advised me to buy HP Tuner interface in order to edit the ECM and delete all EGR, DEF, DPF restrictions. I order it costing me more than $700 with the credits. He could read the ECM but failed to edit it. Another technician advised me to buy an interface from a Russian online store ECUtools.com, I did the same and paid around $900 price+shipping fees. We could read the ECM but same he was not able to edit the files to delete the emissions nightmare. I have kind of new beautiful truck sitting in the garage. Any help would be highly appreciated. Thanks in advance.
 

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Dear Nescio, thanks for sharing your story and experience that I wish if I read it before November 2017. I bought my 2017 Colorado 2.8 Duramax Z71 from a dealer in MD brand new costing me over 40k. I really like it, I drove it for around 3 months (barely 2000 Miles) in the US. Then due to my job I had to relocate overseas and I had to take the beautiful truck with me to North Africa. First week I had warnings regarding the quality of emissions. In the absence of proper qualified dealers the truck is immobilized as the engine is turning max at 6 Miles/h until I fix the emissions issue. As no regulations on emissions where I am now, my technician advised me to buy HP Tuner interface in order to edit the ECM and delete all EGR, DEF, DPF restrictions. I order it costing me more than $700 with the credits. He could read the ECM but failed to edit it. Another technician advised me to buy an interface from a Russian online store ECUtools.com, I did the same and paid around $900 price+shipping fees. We could read the ECM but same he was not able to edit the files to delete the emissions nightmare. I have kind of new beautiful truck sitting in the garage. Any help would be highly appreciated. Thanks in advance.
If you want to delete your truck, you need to get a real tuner who knows what they are doing. If you have access to a computer, Jason Hackler and Patrick Runge with American Diesel Power can do it over the computer for you. You can contact them on Facebook if you have that and PM them directly, or contact them through their website, here: https://www.americandieselpower.com/

I have Jason’s tunes on my deleted truck and I have no complaints. 21k miles on the truck since it’s beeb deleted (70k miles total)
 

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Burgess159 you are my hero man. Thanks a lot for the information. I will contact them the soonest wish that they will help, man that would be awesome! Warmest!
 

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it sure is a bummer to keep hearing these stories. one thing that confuses me is how long our emissions system is covered under warranty. looks like depending on the part it can be 2, 7, or 8 years? I was waiting to do the delete/tune until the warranty is up but I am now thinking I'd like to move on it before I have problems. Plus, it sounds like an early delete/tune can increase engine reliability and lifetime. Burgess, or anybody else who knows can you please tell me if this is how I go about it. I've read a bunch of the blogs but am not totally sure I have it right.
I am also concerned about what order I do these steps.
1) Block off EGR valve
2) Replace exhaust system from downpipe back (to take DPF and NOX sensors out of the commission)
3) Tune engine/transmission for new configuration.
This is the step I am most unsure about
- Is the tune where the ECM gets reprogrammed so that I don't get error messages,etc?,
- do I buy a tuner or and do this myself
- do i have someone do it for me or lead me through it online?

Is there anything else I will need to do?

Thanks for any help, simple, step-by-step for the slow learner! Or, if there is a simple consolidated description that I have missed somewhere and could be pointed to that would be great.
Dave
 

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Just got off the phone with Chevrolet Customer Service after barely squeaking my 3 year old, $38K truck through my state's emissions inspection and figured I'd share this story for anyone else thinking of buying one of these things. I had nothing but great experiences with this truck while it was under warranty and love the motor dearly, but the below issue is likely going to be the end of this truck and could end up putting me in the tough position. I was betting on getting somewhere near my money's worth out of the car, and it's looking like it was a mistake for me to bet on this truck.

If you are considering purchasing one of these vehicles, I recommend reading below. If your situation matches mine, really think about why you wouldn't go buy a Tacoma and forget these trucks exist.

So, flash back to 6/2016, my '98 Chevy Blazer finally becomes too much, needing brakes, front end work, having ignition issues. I'm from a GM family, my family always bought cars new, drove + maintained them for 10-20 years, then sold them at scrap value. After getting a good couple of years out of the Blazer, I am looking for a car/truck/go-kart that will do 30MPG, actually carry 4 adults, and carry a bike rack for 4 bikes. I'm making OK money, but looking to buy a house in a couple of years, so I'm OK spending a little on a vehicle, but need something that isn't going to randomly crap out on me and that I can expect to be able to drive for some time.

I end up settling on the Colorado Diesel, because I'm thinking it will be a reliable vehicle that will deliver over 30MPG empty, but also allow me to transport 4 adults and haul mountain bikes, bonus points for having cargo space to work on the house and having torque numbers that will make it enjoyable to drive on the highway. The expectation is reasonable reliability in the long run, with some typical GM awfulness that I can fix in my driveway.

So, all in all, car delivers on promise. At ~20K miles I get a code (P24B0 or P24B1, I can't remember exactly) and start seeing others with issues, a recall, and some technical service bulletins about faulty diesel particulate matter sensors. I take the truck into the dealer, they put on a new sensor, light goes away. I am cool with this, don't think much of it. 1 bad sensor is no big deal, so if 1 trip to the dealer is all I need, great!?

Fast forward to 35.9K miles (warranty expires at 36K) and the same code from 20K is back, and I am close to the expiration of my warranty. I take it into the dealer after reading about some software fixes...and they totally botch the diagnosis of it. Tell me something might be wrong with the Evap system, reset codes, tell me to bring it back if the issue comes up again. Well, I'm a handful of miles from warranty expiring when I leave the dealer and sure enough, the issue comes back the next day driving to work. Now I am out of warranty. Bring it back to the dealer and they make it out like they are doing me a favor for not charging me to look at the issue...but they say they reprogrammed the ECM and send me on my way.

At this point I am nervous, but still not thinking much. There is excessive material out there suggesting that GM knows this is an issue. I have heard there's multiple versions of these sensors and there's multiple software fixes. My thought is that this is a known fault in workmanship of the vehicle, the dealer has already attempted to fix this issue, so I am in the clear if the issue continues.

Fast forward to 42K miles and the light comes back on. Truck is a month over 3 years old, warranty is expired, and I am in the escrow stage of buying my first home (IE: Committed to the deal, have very little $$), using the vehicle to commute, and due for my state emissions test. In my state, the vehicle is basically useless if it fails emissions. I do my usual ritual of scanning codes before taking it to the dealer, and it's a P24B1. I breathe a small sigh of relief, but also am rolling my eyes. I have a good feeling that Chevy will assist, but also know that I will have to go play along with the service writer's "we're doing you a favor by fixing the sh*t we didn't fix the first time around". I take it into the dealer, tell them it's the same code and that I expect them to look into it for me as follow up on the warranty work. Dealer makes a big stink about it, says that they will "try" and that there might be a diagnosis fee. I am livid, but not making a scene. I make it clear that I know the code, and expect the work to be covered.

I wait around for an hour or two, the mechanic comes out and I overhear him tell the service writer that they reprogrammed the ECM, but the issue wasn't present at the time of the issue. Needless to say, I am a little concerned, because the literature suggests that the sensor in question is used during conditions that occur intermittently. The system needs to be at a certain temp and a whole bunch of other things. So, of course, it is an intermittent issue, and it is starting to sound a lot like the 35.9K visit and I am genuinely concerned.

I go out to start the vehicle in the dealer's lot, on a 90 degree F day, and it says "ice possible, drive with care" - having never seen this before, I ask the dealer to take a look. Takes them an hour to find someone that knows enough to tell me that it's because of the ECM flash, and I just need to get it up to speed so the temperature sensor can get some fresh air. Having never seen that before, I am wondering if the prior ECM flash was actually performed?

Anyways, writing that off, I drive off the dealer's lot relieved to feel that this issue might be done with. I need to put some miles on before taking it through emissions, so I take it for a trip up to Maine from Boston, MA. Straight up 95, I let it run in steady state for a couple hundred miles to make sure everything is happy before taking it home and through inspection.

Heading home, light comes back on. It's 4 days before the end of July and I need to get inspected. I say to myself, "F this, I'm going to buy the sensor off Rock Auto, replace it, and be on my way". Get home, start looking for the sensor...can't find it anywhere. Now, I am nervous. I don't want to take it into the dealer and risk having to pay for a diagnosis, when they have a track record of failing to diagnose this issue already. Can't buy the part online. Can't afford a new car. Don't want to buy the sensor from a dealer, because don't want them to use me as an excuse in any future effort to get help.

I call Chevy customer support, hoping to get some help with my dealer. My thought, at this point, is that the issue is with my Dealer. I tell them the above history, tell them I'm cool with the fact that the car has an issue, but I need some support from them in getting me the service I need. They tell me they need to send it to a "senior" blah blah blah and I should hear back in 2 business days. Thankfully, 3 days later, the light goes off for a hundred or so miles and I swing it into the local inspection station and it passes. This was the 30th of July. Fast forward to today, 5 days after my original call, and I get some useless Chevy rep on the phone saying that my vehicle is out of warranty and they can't help. I made sure she understood that the issue started right off the lot. I made sure that she knew that all I wanted was some help dealing with my dealer.

So, I know the 369 ft-lbs of torque and awesome ride and this and that are peaking your fancy, but really think about whether you want to be in my shoes in 3 years. I'm sure a couple of folks will reply below saying "I haven't had any issues" or whatever, and you will tell yourself "the likelihood of this happening to me is so small", but stop, think about it. Do you really think this thing is going to have the same level of reliability as it's competitors? You could walk over to a Toyota dealer and drop asking on an mid-spec Tacoma and likely never have to see them again for out-of-warranty repairs. You could buy a f*cking Honda Ridgeline to move your lawn clippings on Sundays and burn 10K in dollar bills in your driveway.

Think about it.

-Max.

PS: Photos of my truck attached lest folks accuse me of being a Toyota/Honda shill.
 

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it sure is a bummer to keep hearing these stories. one thing that confuses me is how long our emissions system is covered under warranty. looks like depending on the part it can be 2, 7, or 8 years? I was waiting to do the delete/tune until the warranty is up but I am now thinking I'd like to move on it before I have problems. Plus, it sounds like an early delete/tune can increase engine reliability and lifetime. Burgess, or anybody else who knows can you please tell me if this is how I go about it. I've read a bunch of the blogs but am not totally sure I have it right.
I am also concerned about what order I do these steps.
1) Block off EGR valve
2) Replace exhaust system from downpipe back (to take DPF and NOX sensors out of the commission)
3) Tune engine/transmission for new configuration.
This is the step I am most unsure about
- Is the tune where the ECM gets reprogrammed so that I don't get error messages,etc?,
- do I buy a tuner or and do this myself
- do i have someone do it for me or lead me through it online?

Is there anything else I will need to do?

Thanks for any help, simple, step-by-step for the slow learner! Or, if there is a simple consolidated description that I have missed somewhere and could be pointed to that would be great.
Dave
Call the guys at MotorOps. Super nice Canadians. I did the removal and install of the turboback exhaust myself. Not super easy, there are a couple of tough spots on removing the original system. The most exotic tool I needed to borrow was an O2 sensor removal tool. Plenty of cussing, but that's just how I do mechanic stuff. You will need to get the "Autocal" or something similar to move the files from the computer to the truck. You can also read and delete codes with it so it's worth having.
 

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I am so sorry that your truck is having issues. It is either you love it or hate it. My diesel Canyon 2016 is a 4x4 that has been awesome. Overall I get 26.2 MPG for the 42518 miles I have on it. I feel very blessed because it is the best truck I have ever owned so far. I made a couple of changes and now it has 404 ft. lbs. of torque and 202 HP. My last trip to Florida from upstate NY, the truck earned 34.2 MPG. I was in total shock. It always gets my 30 or 31 on a trip but since the upgrades it gets me more. I feel so blessed that I bought this and I hope I did not jinx myself. I love the vehicle. Hopefully GM will get your problems ironed out. Good luck.
 

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I am so sorry that your truck is having issues. It is either you love it or hate it. My diesel Canyon 2016 is a 4x4 that has been awesome. Overall I get 26.2 MPG for the 42518 miles I have on it. I feel very blessed because it is the best truck I have ever owned so far. I made a couple of changes and now it has 404 ft. lbs. of torque and 202 HP. My last trip to Florida from upstate NY, the truck earned 34.2 MPG. I was in total shock. It always gets my 30 or 31 on a trip but since the upgrades it gets me more. I feel so blessed that I bought this and I hope I did not jinx myself. I love the vehicle. Hopefully GM will get your problems ironed out. Good luck.
did you delete and tune?
 

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I'm also sorry to hear about your truck. I have a similar story but will try and remain positive. I bought my 2018 Colorado Diesel ZR2 for similar reasons you articulate. Diesel an advantage with miles/gallon, long lasting engines, low end torque etc. etc. On paper and when mine was running it was incredible!!! In my opinion better than the other mid size truck competition. The design is bad ass and it was even quiet inside cab, on road and highway. I purchased with intention of keeping 15 + years; an investment / a recreational tool and daily driver. A lot of money to spend but worth it if I kept for many years. Between 5,000 - 11,228 miles every injector failed including the first of the new replacement injectors. I loved everything about the truck (on paper). I went through all the stages of grief & loss: denial, anger, bargaining, depression and finally acceptance. At 5,000 miles when I first had the issue and it was in the shop for 35 days because GMs parts supply chain business model; apparently they didn't make extra injectors (whatever that is). I asked GM about a buy back which I was entitled to under Oregon's lemon law. They talked me out of it. I acquiesced and hung in there for 6,000 additional miles and four more injectors. I just finished the GM buy back but the repurchase formula was now based on 11,228 miles versus a 5,000 mile calculation. They offered to give me another current year brand new ZR2 with all the warranties in lieu of repurchase. I grabbed my testicles and said I want my money back (I confess easier to do with a lemon law attorney whispering in my ear). Now for the positive: once GM blinked (my case was bullet proof) and agreed to the buy back, it took about 5 weeks. I ended up recouping all my money with the exception of approximately $3,000 (user fee based on the 11,228 miles). I have closure, I'm moving on and I have no regrets. I won't name any other manufacturers in this post but let me just say I've gone back to a previous tried and true manufacturer I've had before. I don't get the Diesel, milage isn't as good and I lost some "cool factor" but I anticipate I will not be living at the dealership anymore having to cope with GM playing me against the dealership and vice versa. I highly recommend you consider your states Lemon Law program. If you really love the Diesel, GM will probably offer you a replacement. If not, from what I heard in your post, you might have a repurchase case. Read up on your states lemon law and consult an attorney who specialized in Lemon Law cases and don't trust that GM has your best interest at heart, they don't!!!!
 

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it sure is a bummer to keep hearing these stories. one thing that confuses me is how long our emissions system is covered under warranty. looks like depending on the part it can be 2, 7, or 8 years? I was waiting to do the delete/tune until the warranty is up but I am now thinking I'd like to move on it before I have problems. Plus, it sounds like an early delete/tune can increase engine reliability and lifetime. Burgess, or anybody else who knows can you please tell me if this is how I go about it. I've read a bunch of the blogs but am not totally sure I have it right.
I am also concerned about what order I do these steps.
1) Block off EGR valve
2) Replace exhaust system from downpipe back (to take DPF and NOX sensors out of the commission)
3) Tune engine/transmission for new configuration.
This is the step I am most unsure about
- Is the tune where the ECM gets reprogrammed so that I don't get error messages,etc?,
- do I buy a tuner or and do this myself
- do i have someone do it for me or lead me through it online?

Is there anything else I will need to do?

Thanks for any help, simple, step-by-step for the slow learner! Or, if there is a simple consolidated description that I have missed somewhere and could be pointed to that would be great.
Dave
I just found this burgess post so that may be all i need to get started and hopefully it will help others.
https://www.coloradodiesel.org/threads/looking-to-delete-and-tune-my-2018-2-8l.38831/
 

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I have a 2017 with 17,000 miles on it. I bought the truck primarily for vacation. the only issue I'm having is the ac will freeze up after about 3 hour to the point of blowing ice out the vents and finally stop working. it has been doing this since I bought it. GM has ceased all repair until the figure out what the issue is. they did extend my bumper to bumper to 3 more years and 61,000 miles. everything we were going to do to the truck is on hold because we have no idea what GM is going to do. we do a lot of traveling out west, we are in the truck 15+ hours so imaging the look on the wife's face when we have to roll the windows down 3 hours into a 15 hour road trip and its 90 degrees out!
 

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First, the Particulate Matter Sensor is specifically listed in the Diesel Supplement of the Owners Manual under Emission Equipment, as are all exhaust related sensors. They are covered under the 80,000 mile federal emissions warranty.

I am having the exact same issues with my 2016. Purchased it 11/11/2016 and first CEL was 11/12/2016. In the past 2 1/2 years it has been in the shop at least a dozen times and has had every sensor replaced at least twice, the Particulate Matter Sensor has been replaced six times. The latest trip to the dealer involved three weeks of "diagnostic tests" to come up with " the PMS is failing because you wash the underside of your truck." I have also had 4 Customer Service Cases, all of which resulted in repairs covered by GMC.

I cover most of the New England region for work and have 102,000 on the truck. Besides the annoyance of the CEL I love the truck. Average 32,6 mpg. That being said I have filed for arbitration against GM and have a hearing set for the end of the month. I have requested copied of all TSB's, shop notes and GM communications regarding issues with the diesel. Will keep you posted as to what useful information they contain.
 

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it sure is a bummer to keep hearing these stories. one thing that confuses me is how long our emissions system is covered under warranty. looks like depending on the part it can be 2, 7, or 8 years? I was waiting to do the delete/tune until the warranty is up but I am now thinking I'd like to move on it before I have problems. Plus, it sounds like an early delete/tune can increase engine reliability and lifetime. Burgess, or anybody else who knows can you please tell me if this is how I go about it. I've read a bunch of the blogs but am not totally sure I have it right.
I am also concerned about what order I do these steps.
1) Block off EGR valve
2) Replace exhaust system from downpipe back (to take DPF and NOX sensors out of the commission)
3) Tune engine/transmission for new configuration.
This is the step I am most unsure about
- Is the tune where the ECM gets reprogrammed so that I don't get error messages,etc?,
- do I buy a tuner or and do this myself
- do i have someone do it for me or lead me through it online?

Is there anything else I will need to do?

Thanks for any help, simple, step-by-step for the slow learner! Or, if there is a simple consolidated description that I have missed somewhere and could be pointed to that would be great.
Dave
So, your order is backwards. You want to tune the ECM and TCM first. That way the system is fooled in to thinking everything is still hunk-dory with your emissions equipment. Then, from there, you can replace the exhaust system with whatever straight pipe w/ or w/o muffler you desire. Replacing from the down-pipe back back supposedly makes things a little quieter with the exhaust. I personally went the extra step and did a turbo back exhaust w/ muffler. I don’t think I would want to hear these little trucks without a muffler on just a 3 inch pipe, they aren’t as harmonious sounding as a 6.6 Duramax is with a 4/5 inch pipe w/o muffler.

Doing the EGR block off plate is optional. I have yet to do mine after 9 months. I intend do, but it’s a bear supposedly and I just don’t want to right now :)

As far as who do you have tune your truck. I would not advise trying to do it yourself on your own. As in, write your own tune (as you can do that with the right equipment). I’m tech savvy enough that I can be walked through most things, which is what Jason Hackler and Patrick Runge from American Diesel Power did for me. They send you an Autocal, then get ahold of them and they (assuming they still do it this way) remote in to your computer, do the techy parts, you plug the autocal in to the truck to get some data, they do more techy stuff and then you’re good to go. It was very simple, just need a computer w/ internet is all. I highly recommend giving them a call and explaining your concerns. Deleted my truck at like 46k and now have 70k miles on it. No problems, no emissions headaches to deal with. Your truck will be more reliable if you get rid of that stuff.

I know someone else recommended Motor Ops. I originally was going to go with them. But I’ve had friends with 6.6 Duramax trucks that have had issues with their trucks on Motor Ops tunes, and I’ve heard of a handful of guys with the 2.8 who have had bad experiences with their tunes also. The worst issues being melted intercooler couplings as the tune is too hot I guess. That scared me away from them. Found out about Jason and Patrick with ADP and went with them. Here’s the link to their site: https://www.americandieselpower.com/ You can also find them on Facebook if you have that.
 

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So, your order is backwards. You want to tune the ECM and TCM first. That way the system is fooled in to thinking everything is still hunk-dory with your emissions equipment. Then, from there, you can replace the exhaust system with whatever straight pipe w/ or w/o muffler you desire. Replacing from the down-pipe back back supposedly makes things a little quieter with the exhaust. I personally went the extra step and did a turbo back exhaust w/ muffler. I don’t think I would want to hear these little trucks without a muffler on just a 3 inch pipe, they aren’t as harmonious sounding as a 6.6 Duramax is with a 4/5 inch pipe w/o muffler.

Doing the EGR block off plate is optional. I have yet to do mine after 9 months. I intend do, but it’s a bear supposedly and I just don’t want to right now :)

As far as who do you have tune your truck. I would not advise trying to do it yourself on your own. As in, write your own tune (as you can do that with the right equipment). I’m tech savvy enough that I can be walked through most things, which is what Jason Hackler and Patrick Runge from American Diesel Power did for me. They send you an Autocal, then get ahold of them and they (assuming they still do it this way) remote in to your computer, do the techy parts, you plug the autocal in to the truck to get some data, they do more techy stuff and then you’re good to go. It was very simple, just need a computer w/ internet is all. I highly recommend giving them a call and explaining your concerns. Deleted my truck at like 46k and now have 70k miles on it. No problems, no emissions headaches to deal with. Your truck will be more reliable if you get rid of that stuff.

I know someone else recommended Motor Ops. I originally was going to go with them. But I’ve had friends with 6.6 Duramax trucks that have had issues with their trucks on Motor Ops tunes, and I’ve heard of a handful of guys with the 2.8 who have had bad experiences with their tunes also. The worst issues being melted intercooler couplings as the tune is too hot I guess. That scared me away from them. Found out about Jason and Patrick with ADP and went with them. Here’s the link to their site: https://www.americandieselpower.com/ You can also find them on Facebook if you have that.
thank you for that burgess159. i spoke to green diesel engineering today and got that same story - tune first, delete later. he strongly recommended doing the tune and that the delete might not even be necessary. although he wouldn't give details, the result of the tune is to reduce soot in the intake thus rendering regens much less frequent and virtually eliminating problems with the dpf. this seems like a sensible approach to me. they basically only have one tune "hot tune" so what you posted above concerns me a bit since i wouldn't know a hot tune from a cold tune and my main objective here is increasing the reliability and longevity of the engine, i wouldn't want a tune that gave performance at the expense of engine life. so, the next step is trying to figure out the "safest" tune. any thoughts on that or is american diesel power who you decided fit that niche?
 
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