Chevy Colorado Diesel Forum banner

21 - 24 of 24 Posts

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
421 Posts
All diesel consumer trucks since 2007 have DPF systems. Your fuel filter is not a Diesel Particulate Filter. That said, the DPF should not have clogged up if it was going through regen cycles. If it is not going through regen cycles, there is another problem that the Dealer failed to diagnose. That said, There are copiers that can clean your DPF, thus eliminating the need for replacement. However, if the truck is still not cycling through regen, it will clog up again.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
59 Posts
Hello all. I’m new to this forum and my truck. I have a 2019 2.8L diesel Colorado. It currently has 19587 miles on it. My engine light came on so I took it to the dealer. They said I need to replace my DPF, (I just had them change my diesel fuel filter during my last scheduled maintenance appointment less than a month ago). Luckily it’s covered under warranty but I worry that this is the beginning of the end for the reliability and life of my truck. Does anyone know what the stats are for this? Is my truck going to constantly have emissions system issues? If so, I guess I need to trade it in for some other type of truck. Is this a common issue for all diesel motors or just GM/Chevrolet trucks? I prefer Diesel engines for the torque and better fuel mileage. Does anyone have any information or advice for me? Thanks.
First Welcome to the site ,as OAK said, it's not normal.
I would be asking the dealer "What's the root cause of this issue" you need to press them for and answer. The DPF regenerates (cleans itself) when the ECU (engine control computer) gets told it's clogged via a bunch of sensors. If the DPF is not being commanded to REGEN then ultimately it will clog. It's like an airfilter in your exhaust system. They need to figure out why it went bad so you're not dealing with this again in 20K miles when it's on your dime!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
193 Posts
Hello all. I’m new to this forum and my truck. I have a 2019 2.8L diesel Colorado. It currently has 19587 miles on it. My engine light came on so I took it to the dealer. They said I need to replace my DPF, (I just had them change my diesel fuel filter during my last scheduled maintenance appointment less than a month ago). Luckily it’s covered under warranty but I worry that this is the beginning of the end for the reliability and life of my truck. Does anyone know what the stats are for this? Is my truck going to constantly have emissions system issues? If so, I guess I need to trade it in for some other type of truck. Is this a common issue for all diesel motors or just GM/Chevrolet trucks? I prefer Diesel engines for the torque and better fuel mileage. Does anyone have any information or advice for me? Thanks.
if you live in the city or do short drives, get stuck in lots of traffic a diesel with today’s anti pollution crap is not for you.
I been watching these issues for a while now and most people that have issues with there DPF are not spending enough time on the highway. Or don’t load the motor up enough by making it work aka pulling a trailer.
If this is not you........ And you do spend time on the highway ect ect
Then there is an issue with your truck. An air leak from the turbo will cause the truck to run rich and produce excessive soot. Things like a sensor that is out of tolerance ect ect can make the truck produce to much soot and plug up the DPF.
Bad fuel that doesn’t meet the low sulfer standard or additives that don’t meet the low sulfer standard. To much idle time, The wrong motor oil.
But for the most part today’s diesel are no good for short trips and city living. They need to be run and worked. They need heat in the exhaust or you will have issues.
Most diesels being produced now (lite duty diesels) have the DPF as close to the exhaust manifold as possible. This keeps the DPF hot and less likely to plug up.
Even GM has now realized this and the new GM 3.0 has this design..
Our trucks do not have this design. The DPF is to far away from the hot exhaust manifold. So working the motor is the only way to keep the DPF hot....

If you check on this site the guys with high milage and very little issues all spend a lot of time on the highway....

Rob
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
193 Posts
I been reading and watching YouTube videos and the DPF issues are everywhere. Especially in Europe where there are lots of small cars with diesel motors.
Traffic and city driving is causing a lot of issues.
There are people that have a short drive to work and the vehicles don’t have enough time to regen. Lots of videos where people are cleaning there own DPFs.
Lots of issues in the US where delivery trucks DPFs are clogging up. Not enough time to complete a regen. Some have manual regen settings so the regen can be done before or after a days work While the truck is parked.

I was watching a video where a Ford diesel truck had a plugged DPF and it couldn’t be cleaned by the aftermarket because the DOC and DPF and SCR were all in one long package.
In this case they couldn’t get the DPF separated from the rest of the system.
I was very surprised to see that the whole system was only 3500.00 from the dealer.....
Yes I say only because that is for the DOC DPF and SCR. I thought the DPF alone could cost 8000.00
So it seems these things are getting cheaper..
Also there is a really good video on YouTube where a guy finds the best chemical for cleaning the DPF. It was acid for cleaning brick. The idea was to find a chemical that would dissolve the ash but not hurt the rare metals that make up the DPF.

More and more info is available all the time.
Most of these places that clean DPFs are saying the DPF should last the life of the vehicles as long as they are allowed to regen and taken care of.

Rob
 
21 - 24 of 24 Posts
Top