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Love my 2018 GMC Canyon Denali. It's got 20,000 miles on it already. I have driven all around the country in cold weather and never had an issue - but the other day, it had a really hard time starting in -3 temps in Maine.
When I would try and start it - I could hear a loud noise, like a bad pump, back by the left rear tire and the truck would start for like 5 seconds - then shut down. When I tried to start it again - it would just turnover and not fire. If I left it for an hour - it would repeat the same cycle. It stayed cold for 2 days and I repeated this cycle, with it starting for maybe 5 seconds - every few hours. (I called several GM/Chevy Dealerships - but it was over the Thanksgiving Holiday and none could get me in). Finally, on searching the web, I learned of Diesel911 and got a ride to go get a red bottle of it. In the meantime, the sun came out and it had started to warm up outside to about 10 degrees. The sun was aimed right at the left rear tire area of the truck. I poured the whole bottle of Diesel911 in the truck - and vroooom - it started and ran. (I think the sun warming up did more than the Diesel911). Question - why would the truck start for 5 seconds - then need to sit - was only some of the fuel gelled? Running now - the pump back at the left rear is more noticeably loud than before. I drove the truck 2 hours and it ran fine - but I am concerned that damage may have been done to the pump as it is now noisier than before. I plan to have it checked out at it's next service. I guess going forward - especially in cold weather - I should be using the white bottle - Power Service Diesel Fuel Supplement. Does anyone have any comments on this and using it in the Duramax?
 

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Love my 2018 GMC Canyon Denali. It's got 20,000 miles on it already. I have driven all around the country in cold weather and never had an issue - but the other day, it had a really hard time starting in -3 temps in Maine.
When I would try and start it - I could hear a loud noise, like a bad pump, back by the left rear tire and the truck would start for like 5 seconds - then shut down. When I tried to start it again - it would just turnover and not fire. If I left it for an hour - it would repeat the same cycle. It stayed cold for 2 days and I repeated this cycle, with it starting for maybe 5 seconds - every few hours. (I called several GM/Chevy Dealerships - but it was over the Thanksgiving Holiday and none could get me in). Finally, on searching the web, I learned of Diesel911 and got a ride to go get a red bottle of it. In the meantime, the sun came out and it had started to warm up outside to about 10 degrees. The sun was aimed right at the left rear tire area of the truck. I poured the whole bottle of Diesel911 in the truck - and vroooom - it started and ran. (I think the sun warming up did more than the Diesel911). Question - why would the truck start for 5 seconds - then need to sit - was only some of the fuel gelled? Running now - the pump back at the left rear is more noticeably loud than before. I drove the truck 2 hours and it ran fine - but I am concerned that damage may have been done to the pump as it is now noisier than before. I plan to have it checked out at it's next service. I guess going forward - especially in cold weather - I should be using the white bottle - Power Service Diesel Fuel Supplement. Does anyone have any comments on this and using it in the Duramax?
Captsnow,

Same thing happen to my 2017 canyon Denali while in Utah last winter. I used PowerService diesel fuel supplement and it never happen again. I did get a noise like you just in front of the rear left wheel. By the time I got Saint George ( 300 miles) the noise was gone. I changed my fuel filter and got quite a bit of water drained. Been smooth ever since.
 

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Last winter and driving from Pennsylvania to Arizona I ran through some -2°F areas I always use anti-gel in the winter time I carried several 5 gallon containers and went to dump one in my tank and nothing would come out of it. it literally was jelled in there so depending on summer winter blend you do need winter anti-jel.
My truck never had any trouble starting even at -2 but I’m sure if I hadn’t use anti-gel it would be similar to your experience
 

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These problems are a result of the failure of the fuel suppliers to switch to a winter blend of fuel.
Your best defense is to purchase fuel from a high volume retailer such as a truck stop.
Continual use of anti gelling supplements will prevent further wax clouding.
If you are concerned about warranty issues, you should be able to obtain an approved product from your dealer.
Not an unusual occurrence in areas that only occasionally experience cold weather as refineries try to delay the change over to winter blends as it is a bit more expensive to refine.
 

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As others have said, use an anti-gel additive. Power Services Arctic Formula and Howe’s are both good at keeping your fuel from gelling. AMSOIL All-In-One and Opti-Lube (winter formula) are better as they provide anti-gel and also increase the cetane number of the fuel (increases how well it burns) and provide lubricant to the diesel fuel which is good on your injectors. In Missouri, most fuel providers put additives in the fuel for anti-gel, but I add AMSOIL AIO as insurance, plus it has the other benefits.

Why did your truck run for a few seconds and then quit? Probably some non gelled fuel somewhere that allowed it to run briefly.

It would probably be a good idea to change your fuel filters if you haven’t already. I change mine every 20k but if the truck gelled, I would probably change them soon there after just in case.
 

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I run John Deere fuel protect keep clean & winter formula..anti gel and lubricant, here's to hoping no gelling this winter!
 

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May I suggest moving to a warmer climate? We don’t have those problems in the south. :D

Nothing productive to add beyond that suggestion.
 

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https://www.amalgamatedinc.com

I started adding this at each fill up. Winter formula.
I think Clever User recommended it.
Looks like good stuff, and not just because there's a guy in a lab coat and glasses in the ad. Seems to me like part of the brew is an anti crystallization agent (the better term for that is escaping me). But I can't tell if it complies with the GM admonition to avoid " Aftermarket diesel fuel additives, which contain alcohols, organo-metallic additives, or water emulsifiers." Do you know? FYI, we've been good to 15F so far..
 

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I was in the Marines in Korea, coldest place I've ever been. Went on a float, higher ups didn't listen to guys that were there before. Didn't bring fuel additive for below 0 temps. We'd end up waiting for the fuel to warm up in the afternoon to drive anything. Diesel had a paraffin like top in the tanks. Never seen anything like it.

Side note, thanks to you guys that own these trucks. I've been on the fence for months about buying the diesel.


Love my 2018 GMC Canyon Denali. It's got 20,000 miles on it already. I have driven all around the country in cold weather and never had an issue - but the other day, it had a really hard time starting in -3 temps in Maine.
When I would try and start it - I could hear a loud noise, like a bad pump, back by the left rear tire and the truck would start for like 5 seconds - then shut down. When I tried to start it again - it would just turnover and not fire. If I left it for an hour - it would repeat the same cycle. It stayed cold for 2 days and I repeated this cycle, with it starting for maybe 5 seconds - every few hours. (I called several GM/Chevy Dealerships - but it was over the Thanksgiving Holiday and none could get me in). Finally, on searching the web, I learned of Diesel911 and got a ride to go get a red bottle of it. In the me'dantime, the sun came out and it had started to warm up outside to about 10 degrees. The sun was aimed right at the left rear tire area of the truck. I poured the whole bottle of Diesel911 in the truck - and vroooom - it started and ran. (I think the sun warming up did more than the Diesel911). Question - why would the truck start for 5 seconds - then need to sit - was only some of the fuel gelled? Running now - the pump back at the left rear is more noticeably loud than before. I drove the truck 2 hours and it ran fine - but I am concerned that damage may have been done to the pump as it is now noisier than before. I plan to have it checked out at it's next service. I guess going forward - especially in cold weather - I should be using the white bottle - Power Service Diesel Fuel Supplement. Does anyone have any comments on this and using it in the Duramax?
 

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Bummer deal! Here's the thing about cold flow additives for preventing "No Starts" in cold weather. Most use cheap solvents - which work, but have the problems you describe damage the pump - a common trade off for cheap fuel additives as you describe. There our better additives than Power Service, but they cost more. And ,better fuel and engine additives are not found in part store and truck stops. This is a good source for the education to help select better cold flow additives. https://www.auto-repair-options.com/cold-weather-diesel-additives.html
 

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Thanks cardoctor2, I'll read your link.

Got bit yesterday, in the -4F. Truck started and we drove the 1+ miles to the YMCA, albeit with a whine from under the hood (fuel pump pushing thru a waxed up filter?). But it stuttered on the way back, then quit. We got over the last hill after a few starts and parked it on the street. That PM it got up to ~8F and the truck finally started (after getting a low bat warning). I left it idle for 6-7 minutes to recharge/heat up and backed it into the drive way ok. It should be warm enough this PM, and from then on, but lesson learned. Below ~15F, some go juice gets added. I've got GM service in a couple of weeks and will get a recommend from them, then.
 

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cardoctor2, hate to be a Cliffie Clavin, but spello's and syntacto's like this are usually not from high quality suppliers, and are often from small outfits from other lands, exploiting the world wide web to make some quick bux. It should be warm enough between now and my GM service that I can forego go juice. So I'm going to solicit advice from them, then. Service supervisors will quite often even come clean with good non GM product solutions.

"However, in fridget weather you want superior results we promise!"
 

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Love my 2018 GMC Canyon Denali. It's got 20,000 miles on it already. I have driven all around the country in cold weather and never had an issue - but the other day, it had a really hard time starting in -3 temps in Maine.
When I would try and start it - I could hear a loud noise, like a bad pump, back by the left rear tire and the truck would start for like 5 seconds - then shut down. When I tried to start it again - it would just turnover and not fire. If I left it for an hour - it would repeat the same cycle. It stayed cold for 2 days and I repeated this cycle, with it starting for maybe 5 seconds - every few hours. (I called several GM/Chevy Dealerships - but it was over the Thanksgiving Holiday and none could get me in). Finally, on searching the web, I learned of Diesel911 and got a ride to go get a red bottle of it. In the meantime, the sun came out and it had started to warm up outside to about 10 degrees. The sun was aimed right at the left rear tire area of the truck. I poured the whole bottle of Diesel911 in the truck - and vroooom - it started and ran. (I think the sun warming up did more than the Diesel911). Question - why would the truck start for 5 seconds - then need to sit - was only some of the fuel gelled? Running now - the pump back at the left rear is more noticeably loud than before. I drove the truck 2 hours and it ran fine - but I am concerned that damage may have been done to the pump as it is now noisier than before. I plan to have it checked out at it's next service. I guess going forward - especially in cold weather - I should be using the white bottle - Power Service Diesel Fuel Supplement. Does anyone have any comments on this and using it in the Duramax?
I am in the Chicago area. I have never had a fuel issue with the blended fuels we have. In the past the coldest I could try starting when parked outside overnight was minus 10. It started fine. This week I got to try it at minus 24. It would not start. I then plugged it in, waited four hours and it started. It grumbled a bit but any Diesel will at those temps. Has anyone tried something like minus 15 without plugging the heater in?
 

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cardoctor2, hate to be a Cliffie Clavin, but spello's and syntacto's like this are usually not from high quality suppliers, and are often from small outfits from other lands, exploiting the world wide web to make some quick bux. It should be warm enough between now and my GM service that I can forego go juice. So I'm going to solicit advice from them, then. Service supervisors will quite often even come clean with good non GM product solutions.

"However, in fridget weather you want superior results we promise!"
I was in Tahoe over New Years and I woke up to -4 temps. My friends diesel Sprinter wouldn’t start and my 2018 Colorado started but had a whine for quite a while. I felt stupid for not plugging in the heater or even thinking about it.
 

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it is unlikely a plugged in block heater provides protection to the water in the fuel filter area freezing or the fuel gelling (under truck by driver rear door). I also change fuel filters regularly, first at 1k then just a few weeks back at 25K. However, I add Power service every other tank and the anti gel every third tank in the winter. I regularly pull the water plug on nice days to see if water comes out. As someone on another post mentioned, all tanks have some amount of water, when they are filled, the pump stirs this and it suspends so you can get it in your system. The additives in cold weather are your insurance. The big guys know the score, watch them fill up and they will add anti-gel in the winter to every tank (much larger volume). If I had the gel issue the filters are cheap on AMAZON so change the fuel filters. My relatives change them at the beginning of deer season (just before winter) as insurance.
 

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Chevy reminded me the other day that they recommend NO additives. Period. Think I'll heed that I remember fuel preheaters being for sale in the past, using radiator water. Any one have that?
 
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