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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi all, sorry so long, it wasn’t this long when I started writing…..

Wanted to make a post about my first towing experience with my 2017 Colorado Z71. Its stock with no tune or modifications (it’s still under GM warranty). I’ve had the Colorado for almost a month now. I bought it to replace my 300,000+ mile 1999 Suburban K2500 with the 6.5L diesel. I typically don’t tow long distances or on very hilly roads. I tow my 24’ long, 8’ wide enclosed race trailer to and from the track. With the dragster and equipment it weighs probably 5500 lbs but certainly less than 6000. I still need to do a better job of balancing the load as the Colorado receiver is 2” shorter than the Suburban. I’ve modified my Suburban with a tune and intercooler and it’s been maintained meticulously. Torque is about 500 ft/lbs, up from the stock 400.

Took the trailer for a 60-mile tow to the track (even though it’s closed cause of COVID-19). I wanted to see how it would tow on the highway and over the slight hills we have. I live at sea-level in NJ and the track is in the “mountains” of North Jersey. In reality the track is at about 750 above sea-level so not really much elevation compared to where many of you tow out west. It was rainy and wet so not the conditions I would really be towing in but wanted to test it out nonetheless. I clamped on my $25 FitSytems mirrors I got from Amazon, raised the hitch 1”, set the weight distribution chains to 3-links like I did with the Suburban and I was set to go. I did check that the trailer was level and it was within 1-degree, I forget forward or rearward. BTW, the mirrors worked well, no real noticeable vibration and I was able to see down the side of my 8’ wide trailer. If I were towing long distances I would definitely invest in a set or Boost mirrors but for the daily trips to the track I think these mirrors are just fine.

I was pleasantly surprised. Right off the bat I learned that I can’t give it a lot of pedal from a stop in the rain as I would spin the tires. I’m still getting used to the dead-pedal so I was giving it too much too early. Acceleration was surprisingly good! The Colorado I think accelerated better than my Suburban with the same amount of pedal. I think this is probably due to the flatter and wider torque curve and additional gearing of the 6-speed transmission. Up into 3rd gear was very pleasant. The suburban has 3.73 gears, 4% larger tires and a 4-speed 4L80 transmission, and it’s modified.

My trip took me about 40 miles on the highway and then the last 20 on state routes. On the highway I maintained 65 MPH and on the state routes I went 50 or 55MPH. On the highway there is about a 3% grade that is about 2.5 miles long. My suburban could easily make it up this hill and maintain speed but it would unlock the converter and drop into 3rd gear forcing RPM’s to 3000-3200 which for the 6.5TD is way out of its torque/HP range. The Colorado had no trouble maintaining 65 up this hill but it did drop into 4th and 3500RPM. With the Suburban I would usually make a run at the hill and get up to 70 MPH at the base and try to maintain the converter staying locked up which would drop me to 65 by the time I crested the hill. I think I’ll probably do something similar in the Colorado, probably put it into tow mode to drop it into 5th.

On that hill the EGT’s hit 1200 just as a crested the hill. While cruising on the highway with slight hills the EGT’s stayed in the 800-900 range for most of the tow. I was reading from bank 1, sensor 1 EGT which as far as I can tell is the hottest of all the factory sensors. Engine temps rose from 175 to 185, oil temps rose from 185 to 200 and trans temps rose from 185 to 200. On the backside of that hill the temps came back down into normal. Boost while cruising was around 15 psi and pulled 24 during the climb. Although I don’t know this truck as well as my suburban I assume things would have stayed lower if I had made a run at the hill at 70 in 5th gear similar to what I would do in my suburban. I was able to pass an 18 wheeler that was chugging and losing speed up the hill.

For the record I don’t like the exhaust brake at all! I think with 5500 in tow it’s generally just RPM but didn’t seem to slow much on downgrades. On the backside of the hill as I approached the exit trying to just use the exhaust brake it kept downshifting and I basically got scared when it started revving above 4000 RPM’s and didn’t feel like it was doing much. Maybe I’m old school but 4000 RPM in any diesel just feels wrong to me, especially if it’s not doing much. I switched it off and just used the brakes. I was not towing in tow mode because I wanted 6th gear on the flats which the truck had no trouble maintaining without hunting and holding about 1700 RPM.

On local state routes the truck liked 5th gear at 55, no downshifting as it was holding 1800. On slight downgrades would shift to 6th to about 1400-1500 rpm but would drop gear with slight incline and hold that on flats and inclines. When I was going 50MPH it didn’t like holding 5th gear and would unlock converter, 55 seems the sweet spot.

I had noticed the front was a little light and wanted to wander on the highway with the chains set to 3 links. 4 links was tight, much tighter than I ever remember in the suburban but the truck drove so much better and didn’t wander on the highway. Hence I know I need to raise the hitch at least another inch as I have too much tongue weight. Remember, it was one inch lower than I use to be on the suburban. I may also decide to move the 20 gallons of methanol I have in the front of the trailer to the rear, that should take 130 lbs from the very front of the trailer and move it behind the axles. Trailer has a generator on the nose, fuel, small compressor, small tool box, microwave and cabinets forward of the axles. The dragster’s engine is behind the axles.

My only gripe if I have one is that I only got 13.5 MPG, I was hoping for more. My suburban on the same tow would get 10.5 and I thought given the extra gearing, the engine being less than half the size and the truck weighing almost 2000 lbs less I would have seen at least 15. Who knows, maybe it raining had something to do with it…… :cool:
 

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Hi all, sorry so long, it wasn’t this long when I started writing…..

Wanted to make a post about my first towing experience with my 2017 Colorado Z71. Its stock with no tune or modifications (it’s still under GM warranty). I’ve had the Colorado for almost a month now. I bought it to replace my 300,000+ mile 1999 Suburban K2500 with the 6.5L diesel. I typically don’t tow long distances or on very hilly roads. I tow my 24’ long, 8’ wide enclosed race trailer to and from the track. With the dragster and equipment it weighs probably 5500 lbs but certainly less than 6000. I still need to do a better job of balancing the load as the Colorado receiver is 2” shorter than the Suburban. I’ve modified my Suburban with a tune and intercooler and it’s been maintained meticulously. Torque is about 500 ft/lbs, up from the stock 400.

Took the trailer for a 60-mile tow to the track (even though it’s closed cause of COVID-19). I wanted to see how it would tow on the highway and over the slight hills we have. I live at sea-level in NJ and the track is in the “mountains” of North Jersey. In reality the track is at about 750 above sea-level so not really much elevation compared to where many of you tow out west. It was rainy and wet so not the conditions I would really be towing in but wanted to test it out nonetheless. I clamped on my $25 FitSytems mirrors I got from Amazon, raised the hitch 1”, set the weight distribution chains to 3-links like I did with the Suburban and I was set to go. I did check that the trailer was level and it was within 1-degree, I forget forward or rearward. BTW, the mirrors worked well, no real noticeable vibration and I was able to see down the side of my 8’ wide trailer. If I were towing long distances I would definitely invest in a set or Boost mirrors but for the daily trips to the track I think these mirrors are just fine.

I was pleasantly surprised. Right off the bat I learned that I can’t give it a lot of pedal from a stop in the rain as I would spin the tires. I’m still getting used to the dead-pedal so I was giving it too much too early. Acceleration was surprisingly good! The Colorado I think accelerated better than my Suburban with the same amount of pedal. I think this is probably due to the flatter and wider torque curve and additional gearing of the 6-speed transmission. Up into 3rd gear was very pleasant. The suburban has 3.73 gears, 4% larger tires and a 4-speed 4L80 transmission, and it’s modified.

My trip took me about 40 miles on the highway and then the last 20 on state routes. On the highway I maintained 65 MPH and on the state routes I went 50 or 55MPH. On the highway there is about a 3% grade that is about 2.5 miles long. My suburban could easily make it up this hill and maintain speed but it would unlock the converter and drop into 3rd gear forcing RPM’s to 3000-3200 which for the 6.5TD is way out of its torque/HP range. The Colorado had no trouble maintaining 65 up this hill but it did drop into 4th and 3500RPM. With the Suburban I would usually make a run at the hill and get up to 70 MPH at the base and try to maintain the converter staying locked up which would drop me to 65 by the time I crested the hill. I think I’ll probably do something similar in the Colorado, probably put it into tow mode to drop it into 5th.

On that hill the EGT’s hit 1200 just as a crested the hill. While cruising on the highway with slight hills the EGT’s stayed in the 800-900 range for most of the tow. I was reading from bank 1, sensor 1 EGT which as far as I can tell is the hottest of all the factory sensors. Engine temps rose from 175 to 185, oil temps rose from 185 to 200 and trans temps rose from 185 to 200. On the backside of that hill the temps came back down into normal. Boost while cruising was around 15 psi and pulled 24 during the climb. Although I don’t know this truck as well as my suburban I assume things would have stayed lower if I had made a run at the hill at 70 in 5th gear similar to what I would do in my suburban. I was able to pass an 18 wheeler that was chugging and losing speed up the hill.

For the record I don’t like the exhaust brake at all! I think with 5500 in tow it’s generally just RPM but didn’t seem to slow much on downgrades. On the backside of the hill as I approached the exit trying to just use the exhaust brake it kept downshifting and I basically got scared when it started revving above 4000 RPM’s and didn’t feel like it was doing much. Maybe I’m old school but 4000 RPM in any diesel just feels wrong to me, especially if it’s not doing much. I switched it off and just used the brakes. I was not towing in tow mode because I wanted 6th gear on the flats which the truck had no trouble maintaining without hunting and holding about 1700 RPM.

On local state routes the truck liked 5th gear at 55, no downshifting as it was holding 1800. On slight downgrades would shift to 6th to about 1400-1500 rpm but would drop gear with slight incline and hold that on flats and inclines. When I was going 50MPH it didn’t like holding 5th gear and would unlock converter, 55 seems the sweet spot.

I had noticed the front was a little light and wanted to wander on the highway with the chains set to 3 links. 4 links was tight, much tighter than I ever remember in the suburban but the truck drove so much better and didn’t wander on the highway. Hence I know I need to raise the hitch at least another inch as I have too much tongue weight. Remember, it was one inch lower than I use to be on the suburban. I may also decide to move the 20 gallons of methanol I have in the front of the trailer to the rear, that should take 130 lbs from the very front of the trailer and move it behind the axles. Trailer has a generator on the nose, fuel, small compressor, small tool box, microwave and cabinets forward of the axles. The dragster’s engine is behind the axles.

My only gripe if I have one is that I only got 13.5 MPG, I was hoping for more. My suburban on the same tow would get 10.5 and I thought given the extra gearing, the engine being less than half the size and the truck weighing almost 2000 lbs less I would have seen at least 15. Who knows, maybe it raining had something to do with it…… :cool:
pulling my toy hauler at 6000 lbs I was seeing oil temps at 220. I ran in manual mode and had it set to run no higher than 5th. I think a small 4 cyl should run a bit higher in the rpm with that much weight behind it. Also like you I believe 4000 rpm is not a go idea for any diesel. So I don’t like or use exhaust brake. It does next to nothing on my setup except rev the engine. The trailer has brakes and they work very well.

Smaller is not always better when your towing a big load. Look at the Silverado with the Turbo 4cyl. That little motor is working pretty hard and doesn’t get great mileage....
put a load on it and the milage drops like a rock...

my front wanders with the trailer connected.. I tried everything from changing the weight distribution hitch settings to adding friction type sway control... nothing seems to work....

Overall the little 2.8 is very impressive for its size.

Rob
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Smaller is not always better when your towing a big load. Look at the Silverado with the Turbo 4cyl. That little motor is working pretty hard and doesn’t get great mileage....
put a load on it and the milage drops like a rock...

my front wanders with the trailer connected.. I tried everything from changing the weight distribution hitch settings to adding friction type sway control... nothing seems to work....

Overall the little 2.8 is very impressive for its size.

Rob
I agree, smaller is not always better but based on what I was reading it seems people in the 5500# range were getting at least 15 on the flats. Maybe the few longer hills I have to climb are really sucking fuel (probably). In addition, what I have noticed in my short experience with this truck is that I get much better fuel economy when not using cruise control. With my Burb cruise control made no difference. Unloaded I've clocked a high of 42 at about 60-65 MPH on relatively flat roads, I can't get anywhere near that on cruise control. With cruise control I'll get maybe 30. I do think 42 was me really trying to be light on the throttle and not worrying if I lost 5 MPH going up a slight hill.

Regarding your front being loose. Have you ever weighed your tongue to determine tongue weight? I haven't with this truck yet but I plan to when I can get a hold of a set of scales.
 

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I agree, smaller is not always better but based on what I was reading it seems people in the 5500# range were getting at least 15 on the flats. Maybe the few longer hills I have to climb are really sucking fuel (probably). In addition, what I have noticed in my short experience with this truck is that I get much better fuel economy when not using cruise control. With my Burb cruise control made no difference. Unloaded I've clocked a high of 42 at about 60-65 MPH on relatively flat roads, I can't get anywhere near that on cruise control. With cruise control I'll get maybe 30. I do think 42 was me really trying to be light on the throttle and not worrying if I lost 5 MPH going up a slight hill.

Regarding your front being loose. Have you ever weighed your tongue to determine tongue weight? I haven't with this truck yet but I plan to when I can get a hold of a set of scales.
yes I have a tongue scale. With the trailer empty the tongue weighs 680 lbs. Same as listed in the trail specs. The trailer is a Grey Wolf 19RR
I think that is crazy heavy. The trailer weight empty is 4300 lbs. Its a toy hauler.
The trailer axles are back to far as far as I’m concerned.
All the storage is in the front too.
I had my 900 lbs Victory in the trailer last year and it made no difference in the tongue weight.
I tried the weight distribution hitch set to low and to high. I can put a lot of weight on the front with the hitch and it still wanders. You can actually watch the tire pressure change as you adjust the WDH to different settings.
You get used to it wandering but it still tiresome.

Rob
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
yes I have a tongue scale. With the trailer empty the tongue weighs 680 lbs. Same as listed in the trail specs. The trailer is a Grey Wolf 19RR
I think that is crazy heavy. The trailer weight empty is 4300 lbs. Its a toy hauler.
The trailer axles are back to far as far as I’m concerned.
All the storage is in the front too.
I had my 900 lbs Victory in the trailer last year and it made no difference in the tongue weight.
I tried the weight distribution hitch set to low and to high. I can put a lot of weight on the front with the hitch and it still wanders. You can actually watch the tire pressure change as you adjust the WDH to different settings.
You get used to it wandering but it still tiresome.

Rob
Wow, I would have thought it made a difference. I haven't had the truck long enough to realize the little differences. I set the hitch higher last night but haven't had a change to try towing with it. Maybe later this week I'll check the angle and weights.
 

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Hi all, sorry so long, it wasn’t this long when I started writing…..

Wanted to make a post about my first towing experience with my 2017 Colorado Z71. Its stock with no tune or modifications (it’s still under GM warranty). I’ve had the Colorado for almost a month now. I bought it to replace my 300,000+ mile 1999 Suburban K2500 with the 6.5L diesel. I typically don’t tow long distances or on very hilly roads. I tow my 24’ long, 8’ wide enclosed race trailer to and from the track. With the dragster and equipment it weighs probably 5500 lbs but certainly less than 6000. I still need to do a better job of balancing the load as the Colorado receiver is 2” shorter than the Suburban. I’ve modified my Suburban with a tune and intercooler and it’s been maintained meticulously. Torque is about 500 ft/lbs, up from the stock 400.

Took the trailer for a 60-mile tow to the track (even though it’s closed cause of COVID-19). I wanted to see how it would tow on the highway and over the slight hills we have. I live at sea-level in NJ and the track is in the “mountains” of North Jersey. In reality the track is at about 750 above sea-level so not really much elevation compared to where many of you tow out west. It was rainy and wet so not the conditions I would really be towing in but wanted to test it out nonetheless. I clamped on my $25 FitSytems mirrors I got from Amazon, raised the hitch 1”, set the weight distribution chains to 3-links like I did with the Suburban and I was set to go. I did check that the trailer was level and it was within 1-degree, I forget forward or rearward. BTW, the mirrors worked well, no real noticeable vibration and I was able to see down the side of my 8’ wide trailer. If I were towing long distances I would definitely invest in a set or Boost mirrors but for the daily trips to the track I think these mirrors are just fine.

I was pleasantly surprised. Right off the bat I learned that I can’t give it a lot of pedal from a stop in the rain as I would spin the tires. I’m still getting used to the dead-pedal so I was giving it too much too early. Acceleration was surprisingly good! The Colorado I think accelerated better than my Suburban with the same amount of pedal. I think this is probably due to the flatter and wider torque curve and additional gearing of the 6-speed transmission. Up into 3rd gear was very pleasant. The suburban has 3.73 gears, 4% larger tires and a 4-speed 4L80 transmission, and it’s modified.

My trip took me about 40 miles on the highway and then the last 20 on state routes. On the highway I maintained 65 MPH and on the state routes I went 50 or 55MPH. On the highway there is about a 3% grade that is about 2.5 miles long. My suburban could easily make it up this hill and maintain speed but it would unlock the converter and drop into 3rd gear forcing RPM’s to 3000-3200 which for the 6.5TD is way out of its torque/HP range. The Colorado had no trouble maintaining 65 up this hill but it did drop into 4th and 3500RPM. With the Suburban I would usually make a run at the hill and get up to 70 MPH at the base and try to maintain the converter staying locked up which would drop me to 65 by the time I crested the hill. I think I’ll probably do something similar in the Colorado, probably put it into tow mode to drop it into 5th.

On that hill the EGT’s hit 1200 just as a crested the hill. While cruising on the highway with slight hills the EGT’s stayed in the 800-900 range for most of the tow. I was reading from bank 1, sensor 1 EGT which as far as I can tell is the hottest of all the factory sensors. Engine temps rose from 175 to 185, oil temps rose from 185 to 200 and trans temps rose from 185 to 200. On the backside of that hill the temps came back down into normal. Boost while cruising was around 15 psi and pulled 24 during the climb. Although I don’t know this truck as well as my suburban I assume things would have stayed lower if I had made a run at the hill at 70 in 5th gear similar to what I would do in my suburban. I was able to pass an 18 wheeler that was chugging and losing speed up the hill.

For the record I don’t like the exhaust brake at all! I think with 5500 in tow it’s generally just RPM but didn’t seem to slow much on downgrades. On the backside of the hill as I approached the exit trying to just use the exhaust brake it kept downshifting and I basically got scared when it started revving above 4000 RPM’s and didn’t feel like it was doing much. Maybe I’m old school but 4000 RPM in any diesel just feels wrong to me, especially if it’s not doing much. I switched it off and just used the brakes. I was not towing in tow mode because I wanted 6th gear on the flats which the truck had no trouble maintaining without hunting and holding about 1700 RPM.

On local state routes the truck liked 5th gear at 55, no downshifting as it was holding 1800. On slight downgrades would shift to 6th to about 1400-1500 rpm but would drop gear with slight incline and hold that on flats and inclines. When I was going 50MPH it didn’t like holding 5th gear and would unlock converter, 55 seems the sweet spot.

I had noticed the front was a little light and wanted to wander on the highway with the chains set to 3 links. 4 links was tight, much tighter than I ever remember in the suburban but the truck drove so much better and didn’t wander on the highway. Hence I know I need to raise the hitch at least another inch as I have too much tongue weight. Remember, it was one inch lower than I use to be on the suburban. I may also decide to move the 20 gallons of methanol I have in the front of the trailer to the rear, that should take 130 lbs from the very front of the trailer and move it behind the axles. Trailer has a generator on the nose, fuel, small compressor, small tool box, microwave and cabinets forward of the axles. The dragster’s engine is behind the axles.

My only gripe if I have one is that I only got 13.5 MPG, I was hoping for more. My suburban on the same tow would get 10.5 and I thought given the extra gearing, the engine being less than half the size and the truck weighing almost 2000 lbs less I would have seen at least 15. Who knows, maybe it raining had something to do with it…… :cool:

"For the record I don’t like the exhaust brake at all! I think with 5500 in tow it’s generally just RPM but didn’t seem to slow much on downgrades."

Mine does, with almost as much GCVW. You might be conditioned to high deceleration with your 6.5. I especially like how well the cruise control and exhaust brake work together. FMI, are you using your trailer towing mode?
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I don't have an exhaust brake with my 6.5 and I will say that the de-acceleration with just motor/converter locked is way better than the Colorado. I would not have thought that since my burb weighs 7500#. With 2500-3000 less total weight I would have thought the Colorado with an exhaust brake would have been at least equal to my 6.5. Yes the 6.5 is more than double the displacement but weighing almost 3000# less and having an actual exhaust brake I would have expected more. With the burb and converter locked up you definitely fell (and hear) the de-acceleration, and that's at 2000 RPM, not the screaming 3500 that the Colorado wants to do.

I've only towed a few times to test things out and only one "long" 120 mile round trip tow. On the highway I'm not using tow mode since I want the lower RPM and better fuel economy. Honestly I have not compared the MPG difference of 6th gear, lower RPM (assume more throttle and boost/load) vs. 5th gear, more RPM (assume less throttle/boost/load). I think I'd need to do some testing and compare towing the entire time in tow mode vs. not. I'll compare it this summer as I take the same route to and from the track on the weekends so it's an easy to do comparison. With the burb it is clearly better to tow in OD at 2000 RPM's vs 3rd at 2500 RPM's. Plus the 6.5 throws a code if you are above 2400 RPM's for more than "9 cycles", whatever that means but I can tell you if you stay at 2500 RPM's for more than about 3 minutes it throws a code. Usually I only pull down to 3rd at 50-55 MPH on a hill cause it'll hold the converter locked up better vs, hunting and unlocking in OD.
 

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"On the highway I'm not using tow mode since I want the lower RPM and better fuel economy. "

Well, there you go. First off, I doubt that you will notice any lost fuel economy from running your rig the way the builders think is best. I.e., more revs, lower BMEP's. Your exhaust braking will be concomitantly improved by using your TT mode. Also, no worries about soot buildup inducing limp mode. This isn't yo' daddy's diesel. When I see 3500 r/m for a minute or 2, or ~2600 r/m steadily, I'm fine. I keep my oil/filter/air filter changed, and run Mobil 1 Dexos 2. I have not spectroscopically checked my oil, but believe that my wear is low enough to allow me to die of old age, and be buried in the driver's seat.

And yes, I suspected (but did not know), that your 6.5 did not have an exhaust brake. But I also suspected that it's size alone would brake you.

I assume you have great trailer brakes, properly connected to your factory e brake controls. So, you're redundantly safe there...
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Your exhaust braking will be concomitantly improved by using your TT mode.

I assume you have great trailer brakes, properly connected to your factory e brake controls. So, you're redundantly safe there...
At least on my 2017 I don't have separate switches for trailer mode and exhaust brake so I can only use the brake when in trailer mode.

I'll test it out mileage wise, it's possible it may get better mileage at 2300 RPM in 5th vs. 1800 in 6th. Kind of making those RPM's up as I don't really know what the RPM's are at 65 in 5th gear. Really depends on many factors, TPS%, load, boost. You are having many more injector timing events at 2300 RPM's than you have at 1800 RPM's so it really depends on what the pulse width is for the injection events.
 

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Running lower rpm while under load means a bigger combustion cycle to maintain the same power output as running a higher rpm with more smaller combustion events.
With a small 4 cylinder the load on the rod end bearings would be considerably high compared to more but small combustion events at a higher rpm.

You need to take into consideration the size of the load and the intended speed witch would determine rpm.
Lower rpm means wider pulse width to the injectors but less injector cycles. And less fuel pump cycles. But much higher loads on rod end bearings and main bearings...
Higher rpm would net lower loads on the rod end and main bearings but have the injectors and fuel pump working harder. Cycling more often.....

If you look at a gas engine they say don’t lug the engine. You will destroy the bottom end.
then consider the 5w-30 oil is trying to keep metal parts from direct contact.
Higher RPM with less load leaves more oil between these rotating parts than high load low RPM....
Then consider almost all engines last longer while running down the highway at higher RPMs. Lots of engines out there with very high milage because they spent the majority of there life higher in the rpm ranges.....
These engines show very little wear compared to there urban driven counterparts.....

Keep in mind rpm is the key word
for our little 2.8s 3000 rpm all day long would be detrimental to life expectancy.....
1500 rpm under heavy load would also be detrimental to life expectancy.......

like all diesels there is a very narrow safe working rpm range

Then maybe it’s all meaningless
Because the transmission will down shift if there is to much load on the engine anyways.....

For me unless I'm pulling my 6000lbs travel trailer, I don’t use tow mode.
And when I do use it I put it in manual mode so the exhaust brake doesn’t work.
I also keep my speed to 60mph to keep the RPMs low In 5th....

If I’m pulling my 3500lbs utility trail I just put it in drive and go.....

Rob
 

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"
For me unless I'm pulling my 6000lbs travel trailer, I don’t use tow mode.
And when I do use it I put it in manual mode so the exhaust brake doesn’t work. "

Coloradorob, I think I'm missing a major feature on my 2018 Z71 CCLB. How do you actuate TT mode, but do so without also actuating the exhaust brake? And why? I love mine.

But I also keep my heavy tow speed to ~60 m/h. The difference on how hard the truck works, mileage, safety, and overall driving relaxation is YUGE. We are now shopping for porta kayaks, to be carried on a rooftop trailer. Something we can do even pulling our Escape 5.0 TA, with bikes on back, because handling improves and wind resistance drops so much at lower speeds...
 

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"
For me unless I'm pulling my 6000lbs travel trailer, I don’t use tow mode.
And when I do use it I put it in manual mode so the exhaust brake doesn’t work. "

Coloradorob, I think I'm missing a major feature on my 2018 Z71 CCLB. How do you actuate TT mode, but do so without also actuating the exhaust brake? And why? I love mine.

But I also keep my heavy tow speed to ~60 m/h. The difference on how hard the truck works, mileage, safety, and overall driving relaxation is YUGE. We are now shopping for porta kayaks, to be carried on a rooftop trailer. Something we can do even pulling our Escape 5.0 TA, with bikes on back, because handling improves and wind resistance drops so much at lower speeds...
Buy putting the transmission in manual shift mode. Then using the + button set to 5 then press trailer tow button...The transmission will go no higher than 5th but because your in manual shift it will not up shift higher than 5th. And will not allow the exhaust brake to do it’s over reving of the engine...
You get the quicker down shifts from the trailer tow mode and the slightly longer gear holding before up shifts. With out the exhaust brake.

My company Transit works completely different when put in manual mode. It’s like a true manual. You can make it scream or lug the crap out of it as it will not shift until you press the button...
Our trucks will work like a normal automatic up-to what ever gear you set it for.
Set it to 4th and it shifts normally until it reaches 4th then it will not up shift past forth.
Slow down and it will down shift like any normal automatic. Speed back up and it will not shift past 4th.
This works great for trailer towing. Set it for 5th set tow haul and go......

Do this because I don’t like how aggressive the down shifting is with the exhaust brake activated......

Rob
 

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Thanks Coloradorob, I've done this before, but didn't know that the exhaust brake didn't work. It was mostly on longer gentler drops. But I've never had my exhaust brake over rev me. Not in normal use. Not when the cruise control was on. To each his own, but I LOVE mine...
 
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