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Has anyone had any front end noise... either from the axle or hub bearings. My tires are feathering on the inside also. My truck has 12000 miles on it and my dealer blames the noise on the feathering saying that they didnt rotate the tires in the right pattern the last time. Now how they know that im not sure but my local tire shop that i have dealt with for years says the feathering is an alignment issue.
 

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Has anyone had any front end noise... either from the axle or hub bearings. My tires are feathering on the inside also. My truck has 12000 miles on it and my dealer blames the noise on the feathering saying that they didnt rotate the tires in the right pattern the last time. Now how they know that im not sure but my local tire shop that i have dealt with for years says the feathering is an alignment issue.
You would get faster responses and help other members in the future find the same answers if you posted in the proper sub forum

Tire feathering is absolutely an alignment issue. Badly worn tires can make lots of noise.

Get your alignment checked and fixed. Now, if they can’t align it because you have front end damage then that’s another problem.

Bad alignment will kill half a set of tires before you have the chance to do an alignment.

I cranked the torsion bars on my old 1500 to achieve 1.5” of lift and waited a week before I got around to getting an alignment and the tires were bald on the outside edge already.

If your noise isn’t tires then we can figure that out later
 

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Discussion Starter #3
You would get faster responses and help other members in the future find the same answers if you posted in the proper sub forum

Tire feathering is absolutely an alignment issue. Badly worn tires can make lots of noise.

Get your alignment checked and fixed. Now, if they can’t align it because you have front end damage then that’s another problem.

Bad alignment will kill half a set of tires before you have the chance to do an alignment.

I cranked the torsion bars on my old 1500 to achieve 1.5” of lift and waited a week before I got around to getting an alignment and the tires were bald on the outside edge already.

If your noise isn’t tires then we can figure that out later
Thanks rockcrawlerdude. I'm an older person and not so good on this technical stuff so I wasn't sure how to post it. Should alignment be covered under warranty or do you know?
 

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Thanks rockcrawlerdude. I'm an older person and not so good on this technical stuff so I wasn't sure how to post it. Should alignment be covered under warranty or do you know?
I wouldn’t think so. But, If you have a good relationship with your dealer they might check the alignment for free.
 

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Has anyone had any front end noise... either from the axle or hub bearings. My tires are feathering on the inside also. My truck has 12000 miles on it and my dealer blames the noise on the feathering saying that they didnt rotate the tires in the right pattern the last time. Now how they know that im not sure but my local tire shop that i have dealt with for years says the feathering is an alignment issue.
Mine has been making a grinding or squealing sound since new. It sounds a little like a small rock or stick caught in the left front break. The GM service rep noticed it first when I came in for complimentary oil change. They could not find the cause and said to drive it until it breaks.
 

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Thanks rockcrawlerdude. I'm an older person and not so good on this technical stuff so I wasn't sure how to post it. Should alignment be covered under warranty or do you know?
When I bought a 2002 Tahoe, the warranty for front end alignment was 1 year or 12,000 miles which ever came first. I took my Colorado in when still within this time and they would not do a front end alignment under warranty. As rockcrawlerdude mentioned, your dealer might. Doesn't hurt to ask. Getting a good alignment is important and hard to come by in my experience. The optical alignment equipment has been around several years, but many of the technicians using it don't take the time to do it correctly. Many times they bring the alignment to within the limits and not the target, in my experience. Setting toe-in is pretty easy. You can use a small board of various size. A 1" x 2" or 1" x 3". An 8 foot length will do, as I remember. Measure the distance between the centers of the front tires and make this the length of the horizontal board + an inch or two. Cut off two one foot pieces from this 8 foot length. Drill holes near the end of the 6 foot piece remaining. Using something like a 1/4" diameter bolt with flat washers and nylon self-locking nut, mount the 2 one foot pieces vertically at the ends of the 6 foot piece. Drive something like a small finished nail through the top of these two vertical pieces. Tighten the two vertical pieces pretty snub, but allow movement to adjust. Jack up front of truck until wheels are slightly off the ground. Place the sharp end of the finishing nail lightly against the center of each tire, one at the time, and spin the wheel so that it scribes a small mark around the perimeter of the tire. Let the truck back down. Check the toe-in by first placing the toe-in stick on the back side of both tires and adjust the vertical sticks so that the point of the nails are right on the scribes of each tire. Carefully move the stick to the front side of the tires to see where the scribes are in relation to the nail points. I adjust the toe-in to about 1 to 2 mm toed-in. Check the specification if you have it, or just toe-in slightly. There are many ways to check the toe-in, this is just a method I've used when I did not have access to a mechanic's shop. If I confused you on this description, I can draw it and post it.

You can eyeball the camber to see if it is in the ball-park. The solid axle rear wheels are cambered negative about 1/2 degree, at least that was the case on the Tahoe. This means that the bottom of the tires are further apart than the top of the tires, only slightly. The front end camber should be slightly positive or opposite of the rear. No more than 1/2 degree positive on a little Colorado. With your truck parked on a relatively level place with good light and front wheels straight and parallel with rear wheels, get down on all 4s and at a distance, look from rear to front closing one eye like aiming and see if the front wheels are cambered-in just slightly more than the rear wheels. You can also check the camber with tiny homemade plumb-bob, but you need to be on a very level surface. You can use a homemade water leveler to get the vehicle level. Another method is an inexpensive laser level on a tri-pod. Best if you can find a reliable shop that does front end alignments because doing it yourself with homemade tools is very time consuming, unless you like to tinker around.
 
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