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I purchased a 2016 Duramax GMC Canyon Crew Cab SLT on June 9, 2016 and it currently has rougly 13,000 miles on it. I have been experiencing cold weather issues with my Duramax, but much worse than jeffparkcity has experienced, with it stalling twice at intersections, with the last occurrence being by far the worse.

The first time it was 36 degrees outside when I cranked the truck. I let it idle for approximately 15 seconds then pulled out of the parking spot. The engine was surging between approximately 500-750-1,000 RPM, which required additional brake pedal pressure to keep the truck from surging forward. After pulling out of the parking lot and onto the road, as I applied throttle, the truck started jerking around like the engine was missing or cutting out. After approximately 1/4 mile as I was pulling up to a red light the truck was down shifting extremely violent, it felt like the truck was trying to snap itself in half. Upon coming to a stop the truck started shuddering and shaking violently, much like jeffparkcity describes, then stalled. Upon cranking back up the truck would instantly stall again. After multiple attempts to get running, I turn on the emergency flashers so traffic would go around, and continued to try to get the truck to run. Eventually I treated the truck like it was an old school carbureted engine and starting throttling immediately upon it cranking before it could stall, and as it picked up RPMs, I dropped in drive and headed to highway entrance. That was last of problem for that day.

The next morning, approximately 32 degrees out, I remote cranked the vehicle and let it run until it turned itself back off. I experienced no problems that day.

A couple days later, and still in the 30’s outside, I only let the Duramax warm up for approximately 3-4 minutes. Upon leaving the driveway and stopping at a red light approximately 300 yards away, the truck was stuttering again. This time I placed transmission in neutral and slightly revved engine until the light went green, then dropped in drive and headed out onto highway. The truck shuttered multiple times coming up to highway speeds, but once at speed it stopped shuddering. That was last of problem for that day.

The last time it occurred was on 15 Jan 2017, and it was approximately 40 degrees outside, the truck had 12,335 miles on it, and I’d let the truck warm up for at least 5 minutes. This time my girlfriend was in the truck and we managed to record what occurred after the truck stalled, to include recording of the gauges and the DIC while trying to start back up, and after it started, as it displayed a multitude of faults. Again, on this occurrence the engine was surging, started shuddering at the first and second stop sign that we pulled up to, and then stalled at the third stop sign. Upon slowing for the third stop sign, the truck down shifted violently, shuttered, then stalled. Again, I had to eventually turn on the flasher lights, and tell people to go around as I tried to get the truck running. This time, the truck displayed a multitude of problems on the DIC, listed out in the sequence of events below, the engine would not turn over on multiple attempts to crank, and once cranked would not respond to throttle input on multiple occasions, to name a few. Sequence of events as they occurred, all captured in video, except the stall itself:

1) Vehicle down shifted violently upon coming to stop, started shuddering, then stalled.

2) The DIC displayed “Engine Power Dismissed.”

3) With the ignition key still in the run position I attempted to crank, the DIC went blank and vehicle would not turn over.

4) Afterwards I turned the ignition switch completely off and attempted to start two more times, each time turning the ignition completely off. Neither time would the engine turn over and after the second attempt the DIC displayed “Engine Power Reduced.” Of note, DEF tank was filled at 10,965 miles.

5) On the next attempt to crank the engine it started, but the DIC displayed “Service Stabilitrak”, the Traction Control/StabiliTrak lights, and the Check Engine light came on.

6) Immediately thereafter the engine would not respond to throttle input, it simply idled, with engine surging between 750-1,000 RPMs.

7) After a few moments the engine started responding to throttle and I revved it up slightly, dropped in gear, and started to make my way to a gas station parking lot approximately 200 yards away, but the truck would hardly go, it managed to pick up to approximately 30 MPH.

Of note, somewhere during this process the DIC displayed a message stating something along the lines of “Power Reduced – Max Speed 32MPH.”

8) Upon pulling into the parking lot, I placed the truck in park as the engine acted like it was trying to stall. The truck started to shudder; you can watch the RPMs on the tachometer drop from 750 to roughly 500 RPM, and then surge up to approximately 1,000 RPM.

9) After approximately one minute I placed the transmission back in drive so I could drive approximate ¾ mile back to the house. Again, the engine would not respond to throttle input initially, but after a few attempts started to respond. I then drove the truck, limping, back to the house.

10) After turning engine/ignition off and I cranked it back up. The Traction Control/StabiliTrack lights cleared, but the “Check Engine” light remained on. I turned the truck off and took the car!

11) After letting the truck sit for approximately 5 hours, I wondered if the “Check Engine” light would clear itself? Upon cranking, the “Check Engine” light was no longer on and truck runs normal. However, I have no doubt that when it gets colder it will act up again.

I chose not to take the truck in afterwards as I figured all the dealership would do is state without a code/warning light showing there would be nothing they could do.

Prior to experiencing colder weather here in Maryland, the truck RPMs would surge, but never had any other issues. I referenced the Duramax Diesel Supplement Manual after my first cold weather issue, but it does not mention any possible problems associated with cold weather above 0 degrees, little lone at 40.

GM is welcome to my short 2-1/2 minute video showing the gauges/DIC and actions that occurred immediately following the stall, along with a 2 minute video of the display/DIC as I drove it home.

Lastly, after multiple bad experiences with our local GMC Dealer, to include using DEXOS-1 engine oil in my new Duramax, please don’t ask me to take it to them!
 

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That's quite a problem...sorry about that. I don't have one, yet, still looking at buying one when we have enough funds.

Anyways, whenever you have the issue with it (I'm going off of the first problem scenario you listed), did you just fire the truck up, maybe let it idle for a few seconds, then take off without letting the engine temperature come up a little? Or at least let it idle for a few minutes even if the temperature doesn't register on the gauge. We have a 2012 Ford 6.7 Powerstroke at work and you can let it idle for 10 minutes or more in the winter and drive 5 miles and then it might start to register on the gauge. My 2004 Duramax, I would let it idle in the winter time (and even in the summer for a few minutes) for at least 5-10 minutes, depending on the temperature: around 32 or so, say maybe 5 minutes, closer to 0, more like 10 minutes.

I had never had a diesel until owning that truck, but found out that you have to let them warm up a bit before taking off in the winter time, so as to let all the oil in the turbo get warm and moving good, otherwise the truck gets sluggish and won't go. We have a 2003 Ford 7.3 Powerstroke at work and I jumped in it one day to drive to the other end of our lot and it was cold. It moved, but it topped out at maybe 1000 RPM because it was cold and hadn't had a chance to warm out yet.

Maybe that isn't your issue, but it is a good practice (with any vehicle, especially a diesel).
 

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Any update to this? I am getting the dreaded surging in cold weather now. Truck has just over 9,000 miles on it. Seems to go away after it warms up. I assumed in the beginning that it was some sort of elevated idle but normally they hold around 1000rpm instead of surging between 750-1000.

Dont want to take it in but will if its something serious.
 

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Main thing to remember is that diesels run off of "heat", that's how combustion occurs in diesel engines. Maybe during that cold start/drive, the ECM got tossed a couple of codes and was trying to protect itself and caused the issues you mentioned. Maybe with a couple of ignition cycles, the ECM will clear/re-set itself and the drivability issues will be nonexistent. Hope it straightens itself out before you end up having to take it to a dealer. Just my 2 cents.:confused: Good luck.
 

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Sorry to read of some Colorado/Canyon owners experiencing Duramax engine performance problems. While perusing the forum discussion, I was immediately struck with the possibllity many of the issues being discussed could be related to the interaction of cold-weather upon Diesel fuel and consequent effects upon Diesel engine performance. I'm a happy owner of a 2016, 2wd, T-Diesel Colorado LT. I've logged 11,337 miles to date. I recently drove this truck cross-country from Virginia (wherein I purchased the vehicle used) to my home in Northern California. During my cross-country jaunt, my truck averaged 32.4 Hwy mpg at 75 to 80 mph! I've found this truck to be a vehicle with much to be liked. To date, absolutely no serious problems of any kind. As a "niche" vehicle, I recognize a Colorado with the Duramax option may not be the right choice for everyone, but if necessitated, I wouldn't hesitate to purchase another. And, this is not my first Diesel vehicle. Actually, it's my 5th. I circumvented my only caveat to the purchase of my Colorado (price), through careful internet research and buying in Virginia, from a Dealer, a low mileage Certified used vehicle at a price 20% less than anything I could locate on the West Coast; a very expensive used vehicle market. My savings more than covered the expense of my "red-eye" go-to flight followed by an excellent return road trip home thrown in!
Getting more to the points of the discussion within the forum: Encountering freezing temps when crossing Western States during my homeward traipse, I began to experience some of the similar cold-start problems and engine performance issues suggested by other owners within the forum. With cold weather onset, experience has taught me to immediately go to a trusted Diesel fuel anti-gel addend for my vehicle's fuel. Having done so in the past, in short order, I've witnessed how all cold-start hesitation, rough idle and rpm surging can quickly disappear. And doesn't reappear. Plain and simply, diesel fuel gels, and can freeze, as well as fuel within the fuel filters, fuel pump, and any water within the fuel system creating similar cold weather run problems as experienced and described by owners within this forum. I personally use a fuel Anti-Gel, Lubrication and Cetane Power Boster (Howe's) added to every tank of fuel used during Winter months when encountering freezing temps/nights. I've found this practice to be especially valuable when my vehicle is to be exposed overnight to near-zero temps, such as when I'm pursuing skiing in California's Sierra Nevada mountains. Using a good quality anti-gel product, I've never found myself stranded and a victim of the many associated problems that can arise when Diesel engines and its' fuel are exposed to continuously cold temperatures. Furthermore, as to GM's restrictive lamenstations within their literature as to the use of fuel additives? It's absolute nonsense; GM even admitting such within their fine print for the performance abstracts for the vehicle. Most purposed diesel fuel additives are both safe for your vehicle fuel system and useful to utilize while meeting ultra-low sulfur Diesel fuel cold weather needs and conditions. Any concern lies with choice; proper product and usage. Ask any experienced trucker; they wouldn't think twice about using them, especially during harsh winter weather conditions. I'd recommend giving them a try. Sometimes with a Diesel engine, what at first appears to be a major problem can have a rather simple resolution. Good luck. TMc
 

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Alot of problems go away if you keep the Def fluid full and add anti gel treatment to the fuel. You can add anti gel year around it wont hurt the truck at all. I also use only top quality diesel not cut rate fuel. These tips if followed will end your problems.
 

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MAYBE BAD FUEL? TRY CETANE BOOSTER AND SEE IF IT STILL DOES IT. REGARDLESS, A NEW TRUCK SHOULDNT PERFORM LIKE THAT. I'D LEAVE IT WITH YOUR DEALER OVER NIGHT SO THEY CAN COLD START AND DRIVE IT
 

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I had surging issues, thought it was the transmission....put in premium diesel and have not had the issue since! hoping it was just crappy diesel
 

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I purchased a 2016 Duramax GMC Canyon Crew Cab SLT on June 9, 2016 and it currently has rougly 13,000 miles on it. I have been experiencing cold weather issues with my Duramax, but much worse than jeffparkcity has experienced, with it stalling twice at intersections, with the last occurrence being by far the worse.

The first time it was 36 degrees outside when I cranked the truck. I let it idle for approximately 15 seconds then pulled out of the parking spot. The engine was surging between approximately 500-750-1,000 RPM, which required additional brake pedal pressure to keep the truck from surging forward. After pulling out of the parking lot and onto the road, as I applied throttle, the truck started jerking around like the engine was missing or cutting out. After approximately 1/4 mile as I was pulling up to a red light the truck was down shifting extremely violent, it felt like the truck was trying to snap itself in half. Upon coming to a stop the truck started shuddering and shaking violently, much like jeffparkcity describes, then stalled. Upon cranking back up the truck would instantly stall again. After multiple attempts to get running, I turn on the emergency flashers so traffic would go around, and continued to try to get the truck to run. Eventually I treated the truck like it was an old school carbureted engine and starting throttling immediately upon it cranking before it could stall, and as it picked up RPMs, I dropped in drive and headed to highway entrance. That was last of problem for that day.

The next morning, approximately 32 degrees out, I remote cranked the vehicle and let it run until it turned itself back off. I experienced no problems that day.

A couple days later, and still in the 30’s outside, I only let the Duramax warm up for approximately 3-4 minutes. Upon leaving the driveway and stopping at a red light approximately 300 yards away, the truck was stuttering again. This time I placed transmission in neutral and slightly revved engine until the light went green, then dropped in drive and headed out onto highway. The truck shuttered multiple times coming up to highway speeds, but once at speed it stopped shuddering. That was last of problem for that day.

The last time it occurred was on 15 Jan 2017, and it was approximately 40 degrees outside, the truck had 12,335 miles on it, and I’d let the truck warm up for at least 5 minutes. This time my girlfriend was in the truck and we managed to record what occurred after the truck stalled, to include recording of the gauges and the DIC while trying to start back up, and after it started, as it displayed a multitude of faults. Again, on this occurrence the engine was surging, started shuddering at the first and second stop sign that we pulled up to, and then stalled at the third stop sign. Upon slowing for the third stop sign, the truck down shifted violently, shuttered, then stalled. Again, I had to eventually turn on the flasher lights, and tell people to go around as I tried to get the truck running. This time, the truck displayed a multitude of problems on the DIC, listed out in the sequence of events below, the engine would not turn over on multiple attempts to crank, and once cranked would not respond to throttle input on multiple occasions, to name a few. Sequence of events as they occurred, all captured in video, except the stall itself:

1) Vehicle down shifted violently upon coming to stop, started shuddering, then stalled.

2) The DIC displayed “Engine Power Dismissed.”

3) With the ignition key still in the run position I attempted to crank, the DIC went blank and vehicle would not turn over.

4) Afterwards I turned the ignition switch completely off and attempted to start two more times, each time turning the ignition completely off. Neither time would the engine turn over and after the second attempt the DIC displayed “Engine Power Reduced.” Of note, DEF tank was filled at 10,965 miles.

5) On the next attempt to crank the engine it started, but the DIC displayed “Service Stabilitrak”, the Traction Control/StabiliTrak lights, and the Check Engine light came on.

6) Immediately thereafter the engine would not respond to throttle input, it simply idled, with engine surging between 750-1,000 RPMs.

7) After a few moments the engine started responding to throttle and I revved it up slightly, dropped in gear, and started to make my way to a gas station parking lot approximately 200 yards away, but the truck would hardly go, it managed to pick up to approximately 30 MPH.

Of note, somewhere during this process the DIC displayed a message stating something along the lines of “Power Reduced – Max Speed 32MPH.”

8) Upon pulling into the parking lot, I placed the truck in park as the engine acted like it was trying to stall. The truck started to shudder; you can watch the RPMs on the tachometer drop from 750 to roughly 500 RPM, and then surge up to approximately 1,000 RPM.

9) After approximately one minute I placed the transmission back in drive so I could drive approximate ¾ mile back to the house. Again, the engine would not respond to throttle input initially, but after a few attempts started to respond. I then drove the truck, limping, back to the house.

10) After turning engine/ignition off and I cranked it back up. The Traction Control/StabiliTrack lights cleared, but the “Check Engine” light remained on. I turned the truck off and took the car!

11) After letting the truck sit for approximately 5 hours, I wondered if the “Check Engine” light would clear itself? Upon cranking, the “Check Engine” light was no longer on and truck runs normal. However, I have no doubt that when it gets colder it will act up again.

I chose not to take the truck in afterwards as I figured all the dealership would do is state without a code/warning light showing there would be nothing they could do.

Prior to experiencing colder weather here in Maryland, the truck RPMs would surge, but never had any other issues. I referenced the Duramax Diesel Supplement Manual after my first cold weather issue, but it does not mention any possible problems associated with cold weather above 0 degrees, little lone at 40.

GM is welcome to my short 2-1/2 minute video showing the gauges/DIC and actions that occurred immediately following the stall, along with a 2 minute video of the display/DIC as I drove it home.

Lastly, after multiple bad experiences with our local GMC Dealer, to include using DEXOS-1 engine oil in my new Duramax, please don’t ask me to take it to them!
 

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Bummer deal. Here's what I Think. Your engine start run to warm up, sitting, shut off creates moisture in the intake and oil. Diesel blowby has 5 gallons of moisture pass thru every couple thousand miles. Few know this. It screws crank and running as valves stick and combustion stutters with crummy burn time like you describe.

I've found part store additives of no help in similar sits. Mostly acetone or lacquer thinner - lube oil stripping, Or molasses like - bad for cold weather lube, I feel.

I've been now using Mega Power fuel oil additives for 15 years, as they won't let those problems happen! And their fuel, engine treatment has help my rigs crank and run easily even to 20 below - when other vehicles around just could not crank. Something in Mega Power is worth a lot more than they charge, I figure with those advantages. Hope this tip works for your GMC. Tips: https://www.auto-tune-up-and-repair-options.com/diesel-injector-cleaning.html
 

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Discussion Starter #11
UPDATE:

First off, thank you all for the input and recommendations. Last winter, I dropped the truck off with the dealership twice - they kept for 2-3 days each time - hoping that the problem would occur upon them cranking the truck up and driving in the cold weather, and would be able to diagnose with active codes present. Unfortunately, the truck never duplicated the problem while they had it, but of course, continued to occur intermittently for remainder of winter.

July 2018, at just over 37,029 miles - in advance of the the 37,500 mile maintenance interval - I changed the oil and oil filter, and also also changed out the diesel fuel filters as required for the 37,500 miles scheduled maintenance. This winter, the problem has not reduplicated itself, not even once, and I have not added any fuel treatment to the diesel - ever. There has been some minor surging of the engine once or twice at first on cold starts, but nothing to the level previously experienced, nor any of the other violent reactions I described in my initial post.

Lastly, now at 43,474 miles, and over the prior week, I'd been getting an intermittent "Power Reduced Warning" on the DIC, followed after some time by a check engine light. I took truck to dealership where it was diagnosed with a P041D Exhaust Gas Recirculation Cooler Temp Sensor Postion 1 fault. As I've only had the truck for 2-1/2 years, and it was only at 43,474 miles upon taking in, I thought it would be covered under warranty... but it's not. Dealership, and GMC - I contacted - said the sensor would be covered under the 36,000 Bumper to Bumper warranty, but not the 5/60,000 Drive Train, nor the 70,000 mile emissions warranty, and want $560 to replace. With that, I'll be creating a new post, to see if the Postion 1 sensor is actually the one located at the EGR valve, which cost around $40 online for an OEM replacement.
 
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