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New engines made in a modern factory are completely different that Rebuilt

New Diesel engines are broken in on a test stand in a controlled environment. They are monitored and taken through a series of tests to load the engine make sure their performance is satisfactory before they leave the factory. A shop that specialized in rebuilds or overhauls does not have this technology available and must rely on different techniques.

There is a video somewhere of a 2.8 being broken in on a test stand in the factory in Malaysia. May have seen it on YT or somewhere else don't exactly remember but it exists.
 

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That’s not a break in it’s just testing .....".
seen that before.
Very cool video. I wish it was longer and more in depth ....

Notice how she says “The most powerful Duramax engine“. !
And even though they tested them it didn’t help those that had destroyed motors from injector failure. Or oil leaking from alternators. Or injector line failures....
Come to think of it not sure testing has much value ether...........

Rob
 

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Not exactly. Some of your comments make me think you know very little about diesels.

A loaded hot test breaks in the engine. That is why it’s done at the factory under controlled conditions.

That is why your new vehicle comes with synthetic oil in the sump. Synthetic oil is not supposed to be used for break-in as it inhibits the rings from seating. It was filled with break-in conventional oil after assembly and hot tested under a load to break it in. The break-in oil is drained and refilled with synthetic Dexos 2 and shipped.

just like the guy in your video said, the first 10 minutes are critical.

Think about this. Did you ever consider how many people drove your truck before you got it? How long it sat idling while waiting to be loaded, unloaded and moved around on the varios transport vehicles and on the lot? This would glaze the cylinders and create consumption problems on an engine that wasn’t already broken in.
 

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As it says in the video the testing is to ensure the motor is working properly. It must be run through a bunch of tests before it is allowed to be shipped.
The issue with breaking in a motor with synthetic oil and the rings not sealing is a long time wives tail. Even Amsoil stated that.
Fact is synthetic oil is only slightly more slippery than Dino oil. Synthetic oil is better than Dino oil because it’s molecules are more uniform and it’s stable over a longer period of time. It holds its viscosity over a longer time and withstands higher temperatures. But it’s not that it is so slippery it will not let the rings seat. If that was true the wear rate would be so low a motor would last for ever.
Even the Corvette is filled with synthetic oil then run on a Dyno for pass / fail testing then rolled outside to the lot. Before GM developed there Dexos standard Corvettes were filled with Mobil 1 synthetic oil at the factory.
They don’t have the time to run the motor long enough to break it in.
The test they perform on the motors does put large loads on the motor to test for HP
That test does go a long way in seating the rings. These engines are pre run in not broke in.

The statement the guy in the video said about the first 10 min is something I don’t agree with. I believe the First 10 minutes of a motors life should be treated very gingerly. Some time for new parts to run together is important...

I also don’t believe there is any issue with running any motor easy when it’s new and that includes the delivery process.
But
It is important to seat the rings on a diesel early. The main reason is blow by contaminates the oil.
Its not that running a diesel easy will prevent rings from seating. It’s the longer it takes to seat the longer the blow by gets past the rings and into the crank case. And on a diesel that is bad......... as the combustion process is very dirty. Blow by leads to large amounts of soot in the oil and that means engine wear. Soot is abrasive.

Im not saying you need to abuse your motor to break it in. But you need to start loading the motor early. Get those rings seated by building high pressure in the cylinders.

If you Baby your diesel like these drivers do that constantly look for great milage it could takes thousands of miles to seat the rings. Thats a long time to be letting blow by soot up your oil. And again soot is abrasive.........

Think about buying a new lawnmower or generator. You start it and the governor reves the motor to a fairly high rpm from day one. No easy break in and it lasts a long time.
How about a brand new chain saw. High rpm from day one.

I have a 3 cyl Kabota diesel on my work bench at work that will not start. It has low compression. The cyl walls are polished like a mirror. The majority of mechanics will tell you that running a diesel easy will cause the cyl walls to become polished..... Easy meaning not enough load. I will have a better idea once I pull the rod end bearings and check for wear. Maybe this motor has been used a lot and it’s just time for a rebuild. But if that was the case I should have a ring ridge on a well used motor and there is no ring ridge on the cylinders. That tells me it’s not worn out from usage.......

Rob
 
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