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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi everyone! I'm new to the forum and after doing a ton of searching around online and getting conflicting answers, I find myself here to see if there are any experts around who can answer this.

I have a 2018 Z71 Diesel Colorado. Crew cab, short box. I can't seem to find a straight answer on some of the information that is needed to calculate whether or not I can tow the toy hauler I would really like to get. I have looked through the owner's manual(s) and I'm just getting frustrated at this point. Any help would be greatly appreciated!!

Current Truck:
Curb Wt: 4,481 (can't remember where this number came from in my searches)
GVWR: 6,200 (I think this came from the manual, but I don't remember)
GCVWR: 12,700 (manual)
Payload: I have found various values for this ranging from 1,519 (online for my setup) or 1,364 (tire and loading info sticker). The info on the sticker is less than any other number I could find for this, which is disappointing.
Max Trailer Wt: 7,600 (manual), 7,700 (sticker on underside of truck)
Max Tongue Wt: 760 (manual), 900 (sticker on underside of truck)

Current Camper:
2018 Forest River Surveyor 221st
Dry Weight: 4,574 lbs
Payload: 2,888 lbs
Tongue Weight: 462 lbs

Toy Hauler I want:
I got this info from Jayco's website and I am not sure whether or not it includes propane tanks and batteries
2021 Jay Flight SLX8 236th
Dry Weight: 4,890 lbs
Payload: 2,610 lbs
Tongue Weight: 830 lbs

I have a weight distribution hitch currently that has the following information printed on it. All of these numbers include the spring bars since I use them.
Tongue Wt / Max Gross Trailer Wt
400-600 / 6,000
600-800 / 8,000
800-1200 / 12,000

I realize that because it's a toy hauler that they push the wheels further back to account for having the heavy stuff being loaded in the back. When I called the dealer to raise my concern about the tongue weight, they started looking into it and the salesman told me the hitch wasn't big enough. I'm confused as to why since it appears that with a tongue weight of 830+ that the overall weight falls under the 12k max gross. I also don't trust him because he's the salesman and had no idea about the tongue weight stuff before I told him... The issue here is that I'm trying to figure out if I can SAFELY tow the toy hauler (including through the mountains) and if my WD hitch really isn't big enough, is there one that is enough to allow that much tongue weight on my truck? There would be times where there was some heavy stuff in the back of the toy hauler (1-1.5k lbs probably) and other times where it's just a kayak and a bike or smaller stuff that doesn't weigh nearly as much.

Thanks in advance for any help!
 

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760lbs is the listed max tongue for all models. I understand the hitch itself says 900lbs but the suspension loading is rated at 760 MAX tongue. So the hauler is beyond that weight rating. Hopefully the attached info will answer your questions.


9206
 

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Hi everyone! I'm new to the forum and after doing a ton of searching around online and getting conflicting answers, I find myself here to see if there are any experts around who can answer this.

I have a 2018 Z71 Diesel Colorado. Crew cab, short box. I can't seem to find a straight answer on some of the information that is needed to calculate whether or not I can tow the toy hauler I would really like to get. I have looked through the owner's manual(s) and I'm just getting frustrated at this point. Any help would be greatly appreciated!!

Current Truck:
Curb Wt: 4,481 (can't remember where this number came from in my searches)
GVWR: 6,200 (I think this came from the manual, but I don't remember)
GCVWR: 12,700 (manual)
Payload: I have found various values for this ranging from 1,519 (online for my setup) or 1,364 (tire and loading info sticker). The info on the sticker is less than any other number I could find for this, which is disappointing.
Max Trailer Wt: 7,600 (manual), 7,700 (sticker on underside of truck)
Max Tongue Wt: 760 (manual), 900 (sticker on underside of truck)

Current Camper:
2018 Forest River Surveyor 221st
Dry Weight: 4,574 lbs
Payload: 2,888 lbs
Tongue Weight: 462 lbs

Toy Hauler I want:
I got this info from Jayco's website and I am not sure whether or not it includes propane tanks and batteries
2021 Jay Flight SLX8 236th
Dry Weight: 4,890 lbs
Payload: 2,610 lbs
Tongue Weight: 830 lbs

I have a weight distribution hitch currently that has the following information printed on it. All of these numbers include the spring bars since I use them.
Tongue Wt / Max Gross Trailer Wt
400-600 / 6,000
600-800 / 8,000
800-1200 / 12,000

I realize that because it's a toy hauler that they push the wheels further back to account for having the heavy stuff being loaded in the back. When I called the dealer to raise my concern about the tongue weight, they started looking into it and the salesman told me the hitch wasn't big enough. I'm confused as to why since it appears that with a tongue weight of 830+ that the overall weight falls under the 12k max gross. I also don't trust him because he's the salesman and had no idea about the tongue weight stuff before I told him... The issue here is that I'm trying to figure out if I can SAFELY tow the toy hauler (including through the mountains) and if my WD hitch really isn't big enough, is there one that is enough to allow that much tongue weight on my truck? There would be times where there was some heavy stuff in the back of the toy hauler (1-1.5k lbs probably) and other times where it's just a kayak and a bike or smaller stuff that doesn't weigh nearly as much.

Thanks in advance for any help!

see attached in my post
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks for your reply! So that 760 number is the absolute max even with a WD hitch? I was hoping the 760 was for weight carrying hitch and there was a higher number for weight distribution hitch. :(
 

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Thanks for your reply! So that 760 number is the absolute max even with a WD hitch? I was hoping the 760 was for weight carrying hitch and there was a higher number for weight distribution hitch. :(
That's the max, I think it has more to do with the actual rear axel suspension....
 

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Hi everyone! I'm new to the forum and after doing a ton of searching around online and getting conflicting answers, I find myself here to see if there are any experts around who can answer this.

I have a 2018 Z71 Diesel Colorado. Crew cab, short box. I can't seem to find a straight answer on some of the information that is needed to calculate whether or not I can tow the toy hauler I would really like to get. I have looked through the owner's manual(s) and I'm just getting frustrated at this point. Any help would be greatly appreciated!!

Current Truck:
Curb Wt: 4,481 (can't remember where this number came from in my searches)
GVWR: 6,200 (I think this came from the manual, but I don't remember)
GCVWR: 12,700 (manual)
Payload: I have found various values for this ranging from 1,519 (online for my setup) or 1,364 (tire and loading info sticker). The info on the sticker is less than any other number I could find for this, which is disappointing.
Max Trailer Wt: 7,600 (manual), 7,700 (sticker on underside of truck)
Max Tongue Wt: 760 (manual), 900 (sticker on underside of truck)

Current Camper:
2018 Forest River Surveyor 221st
Dry Weight: 4,574 lbs
Payload: 2,888 lbs
Tongue Weight: 462 lbs

Toy Hauler I want:
I got this info from Jayco's website and I am not sure whether or not it includes propane tanks and batteries
2021 Jay Flight SLX8 236th
Dry Weight: 4,890 lbs
Payload: 2,610 lbs
Tongue Weight: 830 lbs

I have a weight distribution hitch currently that has the following information printed on it. All of these numbers include the spring bars since I use them.
Tongue Wt / Max Gross Trailer Wt
400-600 / 6,000
600-800 / 8,000
800-1200 / 12,000

I realize that because it's a toy hauler that they push the wheels further back to account for having the heavy stuff being loaded in the back. When I called the dealer to raise my concern about the tongue weight, they started looking into it and the salesman told me the hitch wasn't big enough. I'm confused as to why since it appears that with a tongue weight of 830+ that the overall weight falls under the 12k max gross. I also don't trust him because he's the salesman and had no idea about the tongue weight stuff before I told him... The issue here is that I'm trying to figure out if I can SAFELY tow the toy hauler (including through the mountains) and if my WD hitch really isn't big enough, is there one that is enough to allow that much tongue weight on my truck? There would be times where there was some heavy stuff in the back of the toy hauler (1-1.5k lbs probably) and other times where it's just a kayak and a bike or smaller stuff that doesn't weigh nearly as much.

Thanks in advance for any help!
Well my two cents is by looking at the info you gave and my experience with a tow vehicle that was "at it's limits" told me that "yeah it will tow it" but.... when you hit the mountains you'll think to yourself... yeah with the peddle to the metal and the speedometer slowly dropping to under 45mph.. I would opt to trade up to the Silverado 3.0 diesel and a long bed. (def the long bed!) Good luck with it...
 

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As an engineer, I'm always thinking of margin in any system. If I have to work too hard to figure out if a piece of gear can handle what I'm going to throw at it, it's probably time to upgrade so there's plenty of margin. I've never regretted buying the bigger/stronger powetrain but I've regretted buying the lesser one a few times! ;)
 
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Hi everyone! I'm new to the forum and after doing a ton of searching around online and getting conflicting answers, I find myself here to see if there are any experts around who can answer this.

I have a 2018 Z71 Diesel Colorado. Crew cab, short box. I can't seem to find a straight answer on some of the information that is needed to calculate whether or not I can tow the toy hauler I would really like to get. I have looked through the owner's manual(s) and I'm just getting frustrated at this point. Any help would be greatly appreciated!!

Current Truck:
Curb Wt: 4,481 (can't remember where this number came from in my searches)
GVWR: 6,200 (I think this came from the manual, but I don't remember)
GCVWR: 12,700 (manual)
Payload: I have found various values for this ranging from 1,519 (online for my setup) or 1,364 (tire and loading info sticker). The info on the sticker is less than any other number I could find for this, which is disappointing.
Max Trailer Wt: 7,600 (manual), 7,700 (sticker on underside of truck)
Max Tongue Wt: 760 (manual), 900 (sticker on underside of truck)

Current Camper:
2018 Forest River Surveyor 221st
Dry Weight: 4,574 lbs
Payload: 2,888 lbs
Tongue Weight: 462 lbs

Toy Hauler I want:
I got this info from Jayco's website and I am not sure whether or not it includes propane tanks and batteries
2021 Jay Flight SLX8 236th
Dry Weight: 4,890 lbs
Payload: 2,610 lbs
Tongue Weight: 830 lbs

I have a weight distribution hitch currently that has the following information printed on it. All of these numbers include the spring bars since I use them.
Tongue Wt / Max Gross Trailer Wt
400-600 / 6,000
600-800 / 8,000
800-1200 / 12,000

I realize that because it's a toy hauler that they push the wheels further back to account for having the heavy stuff being loaded in the back. When I called the dealer to raise my concern about the tongue weight, they started looking into it and the salesman told me the hitch wasn't big enough. I'm confused as to why since it appears that with a tongue weight of 830+ that the overall weight falls under the 12k max gross. I also don't trust him because he's the salesman and had no idea about the tongue weight stuff before I told him... The issue here is that I'm trying to figure out if I can SAFELY tow the toy hauler (including through the mountains) and if my WD hitch really isn't big enough, is there one that is enough to allow that much tongue weight on my truck? There would be times where there was some heavy stuff in the back of the toy hauler (1-1.5k lbs probably) and other times where it's just a kayak and a bike or smaller stuff that doesn't weigh nearly as much.

Thanks in advance for any help!
Looking at your WD spring bar ratings, are you considering a Husky Centerline hitch? In any event which spring bars?

You need to consider the weight of the hitch head and the spring bars. For Husky the total approaches 95# with the 600-800# bars.

My opinion is you will be too heavy on the hitch, trailer weight, GVWR and GCVWR once you get on the truck with your family.

Look elsewhere.
 

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Buy some SD springs (Add-A-Leaf) and throw a leveling block under the front end (it will maintain a rake). I wouldn’t worry about towing the toy hauler at the listed weights. Just limit the toys you carry and keep your tanks empty. Buy a solid shank hitch insert and you will be good to go. Invest in the tranny tune that GDE offers to keep the torque converter in lockup and fix the sloppy shifts.

I’ve done a lot of towing near max weight but I’ve also had to pay to play in the end. Head gaskets and numerous other issues that I’ve spent thousands to repair. Think about buying a half ton if you’re going to really spend a lot of time towing. If it’s mostly an unloaded commuter and just want to tow several times a year, I would buy the camper and look at a bigger truck once prices go back to reasonable. Just my two cents.
 

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Add-A-Leaf will take many leveling issues off the table, BUT it will not increase the load capacity, tongue, GVWR and GCWR. Those generally are issues related to the combined ratings of many chassis and suspension components. You already obliquely referred to your experiences. Your advice about a move up in tow vehicle is point on.
 

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You are correct. I wouldn’t necessarily say it’s legal, or the best idea, but I wouldn’t hesitate to do so with campers being exempt from weighted tags and such (no reason to get checked by state police), Most hitches are rated for 750 lbs tongue weight, solid shanks are rated at 1k + tongue & 10k towing. Add-a-leaf will add 750lbs to your payload capacity but doesn’t change the limit on your actual hitch receiver, and you’re also correct it has no bearing on the remainder of your drivetrain. With the electronic brake packages and engine braking on our trucks, I wouldn’t think twice about towing a trailer that size unless it was often or for extended trips with it loaded to capacity.
 
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