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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have some diesel newb questions:
1. Is there a minimum trip time/distance “req’d” for a diesel, i.e. how long should each trip be to get the motor up to temp?

2. Is the 2.8 best suited for mostly hwy driving? Currently, I drive about 50/50 hwy/city because I work from home. However, that will eventually change and I’ll have a ~40 mile round trip (mostly highway) commute.

3. How concerned should I be w/ DEF freezing in MO? (It does get into the single digits in the winter).

4. Does the diesel need to be driven “everyday”? Since I work from home, there are times when my car sits for 3-4 days in a row w/o being driven.

5. Sometimes my trips are just a quick run to the grocery store, about 5 miles away on roads that are generally in the 45-50 mph. Not exactly long trips, haha.

6. Given my driving conditions, would you recommend the gas or diesel, and why?

I’m very interested in the 2.8; but I don’t want to get it and then be disappointed if my driving conditions/needs aren’t optimal for a diesel. I don’t tow or haul. My main reason for looking at the diesel is strictly for the increased mpg; that’s it.

Thanks so much for any insights you can offer.
 

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Honestly you might be happier in the gas motor, possibly the 4 but depends on what you enjoy more…..v6 might be more enjoyable. If you can wait a year or two they’re going to roll out a new turbo 4 banger that’ll most likely be a lot of fun to drive, will rival if not beat the v6 in power output, and most likely get good gas mileage.
I have the diesel, spend the majority of my time driving on the highway usually for 30-40 minutes at a shot. While I currently do some light hauling when I make dump runs, I do have plans on getting a ski boat. One thing I noticed is during the winter it can take a bit for the diesel to warm up and it doesn’t get the advertised fuel mileage until it’s at operating temp…..again most noticeable in the winter. Idling a lot I believe is a big factor in killing the DPF, and egr. Even lots of little short trips I really question.
Don’t get me wrong, I love my baby duramax it’s great, and I plan on owning and driving it for a long time. But if I didn’t plan on towing anything and I spent a good bit more time driving around town/on shorter trips I’d either be looking at the 4 or waiting for the turbo 4 to come out.
 

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I'll be honest here, I drive exactly like you do. 25-30 miles to the office 5 days a way each way. Trips to the grocery store. Occasionally take a long road trip.

The truck has been perfectly happy to do all of it. I do remote start the truck as early as possible and do early oil changes (shoot for 35% oil life left), but it's a vehicle for personal transportation and you need it to transport you. It'll be perfectly happy to do that. These 2.8's arent semi trucks, not optimized to long hot heavy hauls moving 25-40k of goods across a continent. There's a reason small diesel engine mechanics are a better pick than heavy diesel mechanics for working on these. They are differently optimized.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I'll be honest here, I drive exactly like you do. 25-30 miles to the office 5 days a way each way. Trips to the grocery store. Occasionally take a long road trip.

The truck has been perfectly happy to do all of it. I do remote start the truck as early as possible and do early oil changes (shoot for 35% oil life left), but it's a vehicle for personal transportation and you need it to transport you. It'll be perfectly happy to do that. These 2.8's arent semi trucks, not optimized to long hot heavy hauls moving 25-40k of goods across a continent. There's a reason small diesel engine mechanics are a better pick than heavy diesel mechanics for working on these. They are differently optimized.
Thanks so much. I guess I'm just overly paranoid about having issues with the diesel emissions system. I see lots of videos and posts in facebook groups about issues that owners are having with their diesels. It may be naïve of me, but I'd like to think that GM designed the 2.8 diesel to be used in a personal vehicle, and not just used for heavy towing or hauling day in and day out. After all, diesel cars have been around for a long time, right?

As expensive as these trucks are, I just don't want to get it and be disappointed in it. $50K is a lot of money. I plan to keep the truck for a minimum of 10 years. I'm at 12 years on my current ride, 2009 Honda Pilot Touring 4wd with 197,000 miles. It runs like a top. No plans to trade it; it's been the most reliable vehicle I've ever owned.
 

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Thanks so much. I guess I'm just overly paranoid about having issues with the diesel emissions system. I see lots of videos and posts in facebook groups about issues that owners are having with their diesels. It may be naïve of me, but I'd like to think that GM designed the 2.8 diesel to be used in a personal vehicle, and not just used for heavy towing or hauling day in and day out. After all, diesel cars have been around for a long time, right?

As expensive as these trucks are, I just don't want to get it and be disappointed in it. $50K is a lot of money. I plan to keep the truck for a minimum of 10 years. I'm at 12 years on my current ride, 2009 Honda Pilot Touring 4wd with 197,000 miles. It runs like a top. No plans to trade it; it's been the most reliable vehicle I've ever owned.
I've had some issues with emissions. At 94k miles on my truck currently. Got a failed DPF sensor at 71k which caused excessive regen and eventually a CEL and limp home mode. My autel bi-directional ODBII adapter let me perform Service Regens to clear the CEL and drive while I waited on the part to show up (it'd re trigger like every 2 tanks of gas). Part replacement was maybe 10 minutes of work. 1 bolt 2 hose clamps and she's been happy ever since.

I just replaced the factory host side turbo hose because the old was sweating oil and I'd occasionally get an CEL about boost pressure not being right. 90 bucks on that and now I'm playing the waiting game to see if the OEM boots are just insufficient and I should go aftermarket. Blown out turbo hose will cause excessive soot which is bad for the DPF.

The other thing to consider is not many shops carry the Dexos 2 oil. You can get some from advanced auto, and even Walmart but the usual quick lubes don't have it on hand so you'll have to bring it with it you. I find I actually save money this way even if I'm not changing it myself. $30 for the oil, 10 for the filter from rockauto, and $20 for the labor is less than $80 for a full synthetic from them (all dexos 2 I've seen is full synthetic)
 

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My 2 cents - do I love my diesel, absolutely. Would I buy another, absolutely not. The emissions systems on these suck, the potential injector failure sucks, and the back log on parts sucks. I'm just waiting until my CEL finally goes off to get my DPF fixed, right now my fuel mileage is probably equal to or less than the 3.6.
 

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I have some diesel newb questions:
1. Is there a minimum trip time/distance “req’d” for a diesel, i.e. how long should each trip be to get the motor up to temp?

2. Is the 2.8 best suited for mostly hwy driving? Currently, I drive about 50/50 hwy/city because I work from home. However, that will eventually change and I’ll have a ~40 mile round trip (mostly highway) commute.

3. How concerned should I be w/ DEF freezing in MO? (It does get into the single digits in the winter).

4. Does the diesel need to be driven “everyday”? Since I work from home, there are times when my car sits for 3-4 days in a row w/o being driven.

5. Sometimes my trips are just a quick run to the grocery store, about 5 miles away on roads that are generally in the 45-50 mph. Not exactly long trips, haha.

6. Given my driving conditions, would you recommend the gas or diesel, and why?

I’m very interested in the 2.8; but I don’t want to get it and then be disappointed if my driving conditions/needs aren’t optimal for a diesel. I don’t tow or haul. My main reason for looking at the diesel is strictly for the increased mpg; that’s it.

Thanks so much for any insights you can offer.
 

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I drive for a living as a Pilot Car and drive a 2019 2.8 anywhere from 40 to 300 miles in a day plus return miles I could not be happier I've retired at LEAST 20 cars since 1996 and can see this might out last me
 

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2016 chevy colorado 2.8 Duramax Diesel
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Ok Couple things here, I have owned my 2016" Z71 for quite some time, I have had my trans and torque converter replaced at 91k under warranty for the shudder issue, I was a month without a truck from the dealer... I am now at 103K tuned and intact, I have been trouble free.

I, 95% drive 50-65 miles all highway to and from work. This truck loves the highway. I have had a Nox sensor that went on it when I was laid off from covid for a couple months last year. I was only driving a mile here n there so my truck was not getting to operating temps..Lessoned learned on my part. From what I have experienced and have heard about on forums is that from this minimax, unless you plan on a tune N delete OR the truck is highway driven whenever possible you COULD have emissions issues eventually.

Hope this helps somehow!
 

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50% of the people here are amongst the normal fraction of vehicle owners who have significant heartburn with system(s). This is normal for any internet vehicle forum.
40% of the people here are apparently more knowledgable than GM automotive engineers, and will tell you that you cannot daily drive this vehicle and that you’re on a course to expensive disappointment.
The remaining 10%, like me, are just daily drivers (or not) who occasionally drop in to browse topics of interest.

I’ve been happy with my 2016 Colorado 2.8D Z71 CCSB. Pure lifestyle usage (errands, going to hikes/bike rides, camping). About a year after getting it, my employment switched to work-at-home, so my usage is roughly:

  • 1 tank just shuttling the kids a couple miles to school in the morning, running errands in the city, and such.
  • 1 tank running up to Colorado Rocky Mtns or other natural areas, at least 1.5 if not 3+ hours on the highway.

I consider the 2.8D a huge luxury, to have 550+ miles (stock) per tank on the highway. In fact, a V6 owner once asked me about my mileage and cussed himself for not splurging on the diesel. 28-34 MPG was common when running stock or without the front air dam. Now that I have a 1.75” sus lift, 32” tires, and a GFC camper topper blocking some wind above the cab, highway MPG is down to 22-28 (which is still great compared to a gasser). Of course you won’t break even on fuel costs (versus truck’s higher price), because it varies so much from decade to decade. But range is a luxury!

I’m unaware of DEF freezing, but Denver, CO, doesn’t get too cold very often, so others in colder areas might know better. Ordering DEF or DEXOS (oil) is pretty simple with auto parts stores, if they (or WalMart) don’t already carry it locally.

At 40,000 miles, I’m quite happy with the 2.8D. I don’t bother with OBD codes or deciphering DEF born-on dates. I just drive the vehicle. Other than generally experiencing pedal/turbo lag when around town on your test drive, I think these are general things worth being aware of:

There’s no oil catch can on the vent leading to the turbo, and it’s a good idea to have one. Sasquatch (IIRC, in OR) makes a kit including custom bracket, or browse these forums for DIY.
It’s true, the 2.8D doesn’t warm up fast on frigid winter days. In the teens or below, you’ll need to run two 5-minute auto-start cycles (and luckily it heats up the seats, which make a bigger diff for front passengers). Your rear seat passengers won’t feel heat from the footwells for a while (but dash vents carry warmer air better).
The 2.8D DOES NOT GENERATE ENOUGH DEFROSTER HEAT ON THE WORST, coldest blizzard days where snow is dumping wholesale from the sky. I’ve had two Colorado (state) blizzard drives in five years, where windshield fogging combined with inability to wipe snow fast enough has been borderline unsafe (but it’s worse if you pull over because the engine puts out less heat at idle :).
The Chevy 6-way seats (at least on the Z71) are awful. Seat cushion tilt is absurdly rearward at low-to-mid heights. And the padding feels hard within the hour. I’d recommend the GMC’s 8-way seats, all other considerations equal. I just spent $650 having a local auto upholstery shop add 1” of softer padding to the seat cushion, which also partly corrects the cushion tilt.
If you’d be considering a suspension lift, the wheel wells are tight. Go to the other forums (ColoradoFans) for a summary of tire size versus lift height and lift method, for an idea of what to expect.
I’m super glad I got the 2.8D. Oh, and it’s a total goat when 4by’ing offroad - a true pleasure! But for sure be aware if you’re amongst the gasser audience who’d just cringe at the pedal lag around town. Oh, and your significant other might fall asleep more on highway drives because the low drone of the diesel is less revvy and exciting sounding than a gasser. And as said above, if you can wait for the new 4-cyl turbo gasser coming in a future model year, it might just be the best offering yet.
 

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2016 chevy colorado 2.8 Duramax Diesel
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50% of the people here are amongst the normal fraction of vehicle owners who have significant heartburn with system(s). This is normal for any internet vehicle forum.
40% of the people here are apparently more knowledgable than GM automotive engineers, and will tell you that you cannot daily drive this vehicle and that you’re on a course to expensive disappointment.
The remaining 10%, like me, are just daily drivers (or not) who occasionally drop in to browse topics of interest.

I’ve been happy with my 2016 Colorado 2.8D Z71 CCSB. Pure lifestyle usage (errands, going to hikes/bike rides, camping). About a year after getting it, my employment switched to work-at-home, so my usage is roughly:

  • 1 tank just shuttling the kids a couple miles to school in the morning, running errands in the city, and such.
  • 1 tank running up to Colorado Rocky Mtns or other natural areas, at least 1.5 if not 3+ hours on the highway.

I consider the 2.8D a huge luxury, to have 550+ miles (stock) per tank on the highway. In fact, a V6 owner once asked me about my mileage and cussed himself for not splurging on the diesel. 28-34 MPG was common when running stock or without the front air dam. Now that I have a 1.75” sus lift, 32” tires, and a GFC camper topper blocking some wind above the cab, highway MPG is down to 22-28 (which is still great compared to a gasser). Of course you won’t break even on fuel costs (versus truck’s higher price), because it varies so much from decade to decade. But range is a luxury!

I’m unaware of DEF freezing, but Denver, CO, doesn’t get too cold very often, so others in colder areas might know better. Ordering DEF or DEXOS (oil) is pretty simple with auto parts stores, if they (or WalMart) don’t already carry it locally.

At 40,000 miles, I’m quite happy with the 2.8D. I don’t bother with OBD codes or deciphering DEF born-on dates. I just drive the vehicle. Other than generally experiencing pedal/turbo lag when around town on your test drive, I think these are general things worth being aware of:











I’m super glad I got the 2.8D. Oh, and it’s a total goat when 4by’ing offroad - a true pleasure! But for sure be aware if you’re amongst the gasser audience who’d just cringe at the pedal lag around town. Oh, and your significant other might fall asleep more on highway drives because the low drone of the diesel is less revvy and exciting sounding than a gasser. And as said above, if you can wait for the new 4-cyl turbo gasser coming in a future model year, it might just be the best offering yet.
very well said!!! lol.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
50% of the people here are amongst the normal fraction of vehicle owners who have significant heartburn with system(s). This is normal for any internet vehicle forum.
40% of the people here are apparently more knowledgable than GM automotive engineers, and will tell you that you cannot daily drive this vehicle and that you’re on a course to expensive disappointment.
The remaining 10%, like me, are just daily drivers (or not) who occasionally drop in to browse topics of interest.

I’ve been happy with my 2016 Colorado 2.8D Z71 CCSB. Pure lifestyle usage (errands, going to hikes/bike rides, camping). About a year after getting it, my employment switched to work-at-home, so my usage is roughly:

  • 1 tank just shuttling the kids a couple miles to school in the morning, running errands in the city, and such.
  • 1 tank running up to Colorado Rocky Mtns or other natural areas, at least 1.5 if not 3+ hours on the highway.

I consider the 2.8D a huge luxury, to have 550+ miles (stock) per tank on the highway. In fact, a V6 owner once asked me about my mileage and cussed himself for not splurging on the diesel. 28-34 MPG was common when running stock or without the front air dam. Now that I have a 1.75” sus lift, 32” tires, and a GFC camper topper blocking some wind above the cab, highway MPG is down to 22-28 (which is still great compared to a gasser). Of course you won’t break even on fuel costs (versus truck’s higher price), because it varies so much from decade to decade. But range is a luxury!

I’m unaware of DEF freezing, but Denver, CO, doesn’t get too cold very often, so others in colder areas might know better. Ordering DEF or DEXOS (oil) is pretty simple with auto parts stores, if they (or WalMart) don’t already carry it locally.

At 40,000 miles, I’m quite happy with the 2.8D. I don’t bother with OBD codes or deciphering DEF born-on dates. I just drive the vehicle. Other than generally experiencing pedal/turbo lag when around town on your test drive, I think these are general things worth being aware of:











I’m super glad I got the 2.8D. Oh, and it’s a total goat when 4by’ing offroad - a true pleasure! But for sure be aware if you’re amongst the gasser audience who’d just cringe at the pedal lag around town. Oh, and your significant other might fall asleep more on highway drives because the low drone of the diesel is less revvy and exciting sounding than a gasser. And as said above, if you can wait for the new 4-cyl turbo gasser coming in a future model year, it might just be the best offering yet.
Very well written reply. Thanks so much. I appreciate you taking the time to write this for me and anyone else who might be watching.
 

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I was in the initial 10% of the people just here and happy with my ZR2 until I started having issues with the DPF that GM refuses to fix until I have a check engine light. Does that mean I transitioned to the 50% population? Of the three people that I know personally with a 2.8, two of us have issues (one bad injector, then my DPF), the third without issues...

Like was mentioned, the 2.8 is amazing off-road, and great when driving up I70 and the big hills as it doesn't have to scream like the 3.6 likely does. The pedal lag (torque management) is downright dangerous and now I drive like an old lady when it comes to pulling out into traffic.
 

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Had mine since 2017. Daily under 2 miles each way errand runs and road trip machine. Get around 28-32 mpg while it n road trip. Get a constant 23 around town.
Its a total turd if you like fast rev. Have not have any issue with it for 50K. Off-road, total enjoyment. Camping and exploring, super fun.
Honest opinion, if you are even slightly unsure of owning one, don’t buy it. You will definitely find enough minor flaws after ownership to confirm your hesitation and make you regret your purchase.
 

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50% of the people here are amongst the normal fraction of vehicle owners who have significant heartburn with system(s). This is normal for any internet vehicle forum.
40% of the people here are apparently more knowledgable than GM automotive engineers, and will tell you that you cannot daily drive this vehicle and that you’re on a course to expensive disappointment.
The remaining 10%, like me, are just daily drivers (or not) who occasionally drop in to browse topics of interest.

I’ve been happy with my 2016 Colorado 2.8D Z71 CCSB. Pure lifestyle usage (errands, going to hikes/bike rides, camping). About a year after getting it, my employment switched to work-at-home, so my usage is roughly:

  • 1 tank just shuttling the kids a couple miles to school in the morning, running errands in the city, and such.
  • 1 tank running up to Colorado Rocky Mtns or other natural areas, at least 1.5 if not 3+ hours on the highway.

I consider the 2.8D a huge luxury, to have 550+ miles (stock) per tank on the highway. In fact, a V6 owner once asked me about my mileage and cussed himself for not splurging on the diesel. 28-34 MPG was common when running stock or without the front air dam. Now that I have a 1.75” sus lift, 32” tires, and a GFC camper topper blocking some wind above the cab, highway MPG is down to 22-28 (which is still great compared to a gasser). Of course you won’t break even on fuel costs (versus truck’s higher price), because it varies so much from decade to decade. But range is a luxury!

I’m unaware of DEF freezing, but Denver, CO, doesn’t get too cold very often, so others in colder areas might know better. Ordering DEF or DEXOS (oil) is pretty simple with auto parts stores, if they (or WalMart) don’t already carry it locally.

At 40,000 miles, I’m quite happy with the 2.8D. I don’t bother with OBD codes or deciphering DEF born-on dates. I just drive the vehicle. Other than generally experiencing pedal/turbo lag when around town on your test drive, I think these are general things worth being aware of:











I’m super glad I got the 2.8D. Oh, and it’s a total goat when 4by’ing offroad - a true pleasure! But for sure be aware if you’re amongst the gasser audience who’d just cringe at the pedal lag around town. Oh, and your significant other might fall asleep more on highway drives because the low drone of the diesel is less revvy and exciting sounding than a gasser. And as said above, if you can wait for the new 4-cyl turbo gasser coming in a future model year, it might just be the best offering yet.
 

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I always enjoy reading comments. I have just over 53000 miles on my 2018 Colorado Diesel. I have seen a great variation in mileage. Winter & city with short trips, 3-5 miles and a lot of idling in the winter drops me to to mid teens but on the highway I can get 30++ mpg depending on driving. I have made 2 cross country (Calif to Tenn, Northern Idaho/Wyoming) towing a trailer and mileage again in mid to low teens but very impressed with the torque. I had a 1997 Dodge 3500 Turbo Diesel 4/4 automatic that was never anything but a headache and a $$$$ drain, most gutless vehicle other than a 1966 VW I have ever owned. Lousy MPG and couldn't pull a lawnmower more than 20 MPH uphill.
I am VERY impressed with my 2.8L. I do pull a 17ft camping trailer (2021 Passport Hideout) but am disappointed with the MPG as it really isn't that heavy. Suspect more of a wind resistance issue and need to look into options to remedy this.
Regarding pedal lag. I had a Banks Pedal Monster installed and am overwhelmed with the difference. Pedal lag is gone and my wife says to go easy so she doesn't get whiplash. It is adjustable from normal to sport (I think 1-8) and I feel the #5 setting is perfect, even great with towing. Only kicks in until about 55 MPH and then all is "normal." I will also admit the trips I have taken with my RV in tow were speed limits of mostly 75-80 MPH and I didn't have any trouble with those speeds but was probably a significant factor for my lower MPG.
Would I buy this truck again, YES, in a heartbeat. I am really enjoying it. Almost no wear on the tires so far - also impressive.
 

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I have some diesel newb questions:
1. Is there a minimum trip time/distance “req’d” for a diesel, i.e. how long should each trip be to get the motor up to temp?

2. Is the 2.8 best suited for mostly hwy driving? Currently, I drive about 50/50 hwy/city because I work from home. However, that will eventually change and I’ll have a ~40 mile round trip (mostly highway) commute.

3. How concerned should I be w/ DEF freezing in MO? (It does get into the single digits in the winter).

4. Does the diesel need to be driven “everyday”? Since I work from home, there are times when my car sits for 3-4 days in a row w/o being driven.

5. Sometimes my trips are just a quick run to the grocery store, about 5 miles away on roads that are generally in the 45-50 mph. Not exactly long trips, haha.

6. Given my driving conditions, would you recommend the gas or diesel, and why?

I’m very interested in the 2.8; but I don’t want to get it and then be disappointed if my driving conditions/needs aren’t optimal for a diesel. I don’t tow or haul. My main reason for looking at the diesel is strictly for the increased mpg; that’s it.

Thanks so much for any insights you can offer.
1. AFAIK there are no published minimum trip times, however, it is not good for any engine to repeatedly be used for very short trips where it does not come up to temp. The heavy iron block combined with the fact that it relies on compression ignition means that, in theory, it does not run very well at cold temps, and it takes a little longer than most vehicles to warm up. That said, mine runs perfect from start, and I don't notice any issues. Like most ppl on the forum, I use the remote start to let it warm up as much as possible.

2. It's not necessarily best suited for HWY, but it does shine there. Cruising along at 75 at around 2000rpm is very pleasant. Around town it does just fine as long as you're not in a hurry. Acceleration is not its strength. I think the V6 would be more zippy with more power and less weight over the front wheels.

3. The freezing point at DEF is 12ºF so it is a potential problem, however, I think GM has engineered around this. The tank has a heater, and I think it can run fine even if it were briefly frozen. I live in Salt Lake City, which can have cold temps, and I have never had a problem with it.

4. I also work from home, and my truck sits for days at a time. I do not think this is an issue. If it were to sit for months at a time you might start having problems, as you would with any vehicle.

5. Short trips are fine as long as that's not all you do. The truck needs to do a regen every so often, and for this the engine needs to come up to temp and be driven long enough for the cycle to complete. If you shut off the engine before it completes, the computer will just try again the next time it runs. However, if it never completes regen, it will eventually go into limp mode and regen will have to be performed manually at the dealer. I have never experienced this in my own truck, but it did happen in my buddy's truck while I was a passenger, and I can tell you it is a pain in the ass.

I take a lot of short trips to the Home Depot which is 10min from my house, and I don't really think about it. I have enough HWY driving mixed in that it's never been a problem. If you exclusively do short trips, however, then I don't think the diesel is for you, as you will certainly have problems.

6. This is a tough one. I love my 2.8 and have had no real issues, but TBH it's hard to recommend. The engine is wonderful and very durable, but the emissions system is so complicated that it's prone to problems. For MPGs you have to ask yourself if the extra cost of the upgrade will pay for itself, and if you do the math, it will take a very long time. So then it comes down to range and driving dynamics, and those are very nice, but if you're not towing you may not really see the advantage.

The other thing is that the 2.8 is probably not long for this world. GM sold the plant where it's produced, and I don't think it will be available much longer. That means parts could become even harder to get.

For your use, I recommend going with gas. You will save money up front, have fewer potential issues, and really the V6 will probably be more fun to drive around town. Additionally, since you're not towing, and depending on your off road aspirations, you might also look at the Honda Ridgeline, Hyundai Santa Cruz, or the forthcoming Ford Maverick. Those will all get better MPGs, have better interiors, and be more pleasant to drive around town.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
1. AFAIK there are no published minimum trip times, however, it is not good for any engine to repeatedly be used for very short trips where it does not come up to temp. The heavy iron block combined with the fact that it relies on compression ignition means that, in theory, it does not run very well at cold temps, and it takes a little longer than most vehicles to warm up. That said, mine runs perfect from start, and I don't notice any issues. Like most ppl on the forum, I use the remote start to let it warm up as much as possible.

2. It's not necessarily best suited for HWY, but it does shine there. Cruising along at 75 at around 2000rpm is very pleasant. Around town it does just fine as long as you're not in a hurry. Acceleration is not its strength. I think the V6 would be more zippy with more power and less weight over the front wheels.

3. The freezing point at DEF is 12ºF so it is a potential problem, however, I think GM has engineered around this. The tank has a heater, and I think it can run fine even if it were briefly frozen. I live in Salt Lake City, which can have cold temps, and I have never had a problem with it.

4. I also work from home, and my truck sits for days at a time. I do not think this is an issue. If it were to sit for months at a time you might start having problems, as you would with any vehicle.

5. Short trips are fine as long as that's not all you do. The truck needs to do a regen every so often, and for this the engine needs to come up to temp and be driven long enough for the cycle to complete. If you shut off the engine before it completes, the computer will just try again the next time it runs. However, if it never completes regen, it will eventually go into limp mode and regen will have to be performed manually at the dealer. I have never experienced this in my own truck, but it did happen in my buddy's truck while I was a passenger, and I can tell you it is a pain in the ass.

I take a lot of short trips to the Home Depot which is 10min from my house, and I don't really think about it. I have enough HWY driving mixed in that it's never been a problem. If you exclusively do short trips, however, then I don't think the diesel is for you, as you will certainly have problems.

6. This is a tough one. I love my 2.8 and have had no real issues, but TBH it's hard to recommend. The engine is wonderful and very durable, but the emissions system is so complicated that it's prone to problems. For MPGs you have to ask yourself if the extra cost of the upgrade will pay for itself, and if you do the math, it will take a very long time. So then it comes down to range and driving dynamics, and those are very nice, but if you're not towing you may not really see the advantage.

The other thing is that the 2.8 is probably not long for this world. GM sold the plant where it's produced, and I don't think it will be available much longer. That means parts could become even harder to get.

For your use, I recommend going with gas. You will save money up front, have fewer potential issues, and really the V6 will probably be more fun to drive around town. Additionally, since you're not towing, and depending on your off road aspirations, you might also look at the Honda Ridgeline, Hyundai Santa Cruz, or the forthcoming Ford Maverick. Those will all get better MPGs, have better interiors, and be more pleasant to drive around town.
Wow, lots of great info and definitely makes me reconsider. I think the 2.8 is a fine engine, I'm just not sure my driving habits and needs warrant it. My main interest in the 2.8 was purely for the increased mpg. I've definitely got some things to think about. I won't be buying til next year, so who knows what the 2022 ZR2 will be like.
 

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As posted before, to recover any of the diesel upcharge it needs to be a long term hold, esp. if you won't be towing. I tow an 18' 5,600# enclosed car hauler from time to time, and at 39,000 mi, mine is definitely a long term hold.

Good luck with your decision!
 

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Wow, lots of great info and definitely makes me reconsider. I think the 2.8 is a fine engine, I'm just not sure my driving habits and needs warrant it. My main interest in the 2.8 was purely for the increased mpg. I've definitely got some things to think about. I won't be buying til next year, so who knows what the 2022 ZR2 will be like.
If they do put a turbo 4 in it, that would be tits. Low end torque like the diesel but with plenty of power in the higher revs. MPGs won't be as good, but probably better than the V6 if you don't have a lead foot.

Oh the other thing about diesel is that, in the winter months especially (they have to use a more expensive blend so it doesn't gel), it can be more than $.50 more expensive, which also negates the mpg benefit from a $$$ perspective.
 
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