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I have just over 8000 miles on my 17 Canyon. Had the oil changed and the DEF topped off at the dealer at 5500 miles. 2500 miles later I am at 24% DEF but do not plan to get the next oil change until the oil life is about 10%. As such, I figure at 24% it is good time to top off the DEF myself. Knowing buying it from the pump at the local truck stop is cheaper and I only get what I need at that time, I headed off to the local truck stop. This is my first diesel that uses DEF so this was my first time doing this.

When I got to the pump the DEF cap was not budging. I’d had it off before “just to see” and knew it shouldn’t be that tight. I took a pliers out of the truck and with a little extra effort it came off. However, it was caked in dried out DEF which flaked all over the place.

So, with the cap off and the flaked white stuff brushed off I went about pumping the DEF. I inserted the pump nozzle and swiped my credit card. Well, turns out the truck stop’s credit card lines were down. I waited about 5 minutes but since I didn’t really need the DEF right then and there decided to go home and come back later. I put the cap back on and headed back out onto the interstate. Within a few miles I got the low quality DEF warning stating speed would be reduced in 99 miles. (It is the DEF the dealer put in when the oil was changed as I couldn’t get any at the truck stop.) After about 5 miles the warning went away and did not return for the rest of the 10 miles I drove. I have a company car daily driver I have to drive so I havent driven the Canyon since.

I am planning to take it on another road trip in a couple weeks. Think I need to worry?

Any idea why the cap (inside and threaded area) was caked with dried flakey DEF?
 

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The stuff dries and crystallizes, that’s normal for it. It’s nasty stuff and it’s corrosive, so wash it off the body.

I’ve gotten a def message after filling it as well. I didn’t have it reoccur, hopefully yours doesn’t either

I say drive it as much as you can before the rad trip
 

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Yes. DEF is basically Urea or it is urea...anyways, Urea is a Nitrogen fertilizer. And any fertilizer is very corrosive; you should see our new CAT skid loader we just 2 years ago and how much it already has on it from living in a fertilizer bulk plant most of its life :( so definitely wipe/ wash it off if you spill any on the truck when filling up.

Never gotten a message about DEF quality. I would say drive it a bunch like RC said and see if it actually does reduce power while you're still near to your dealer before you go on a long road trip far from home.

Also, on your oil changes. My first few oil changes, the oil life percentage still read around 40-50% life when I finally changed mine at 5000-6000 miles. I would advise not following the oil life %. I think RC would agree with me too and go by miles driven and how hard those miles have been (like, daily driver; go to 6000 miles. towing; go to 4000-5000 miles and then change). From what I have heard, the oil that we can use in these trucks that the emissions system likes and stays happy with isn't actually very protective of your engine.

So, going much past 5000-6000 miles per change with 5w30 (I use the Pennzoil Platinum Euro L but there are a few other qualified oils you can use) may lead to increased wear on engine parts. Now, if you could use an oil like 5w40 Shell Rotella T6 Full Syn. Heavy Duty Diesel oil, which I think CleverUsername has said is a good oil for wearability (?), you could perhaps go for longer intervals on a daily driver type truck. But, that oil is not approved for use with our emissions systems. But yea, I wouldn't go by the oil life % personally; go by miles driven.
 

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Also, on your oil changes. My first few oil changes, the oil life percentage still read around 40-50% life when I finally changed mine at 5000-6000 miles. I would advise not following the oil life %. I think RC would agree with me too and go by miles driven and how hard those miles have been (like, daily driver; go to 6000 miles. towing; go to 4000-5000 miles and then change). From what I have heard, the oil that we can use in these trucks that the emissions system likes and stays happy with isn't actually very protective of your engine.

So, going much past 5000-6000 miles per change with 5w30 (I use the Pennzoil Platinum Euro L but there are a few other qualified oils you can use) may lead to increased wear on engine parts. Now, if you could use an oil like 5w40 Shell Rotella T6 Full Syn. Heavy Duty Diesel oil, which I think CleverUsername has said is a good oil for wearability (?), you could perhaps go for longer intervals on a daily driver type truck. But, that oil is not approved for use with our emissions systems. But yea, I wouldn't go by the oil life % personally; go by miles driven.
The oil's life will be determined by your driving style, conditions and environmental factors. An oil analysis will determine the "health" of your engine and how the oil is holding up. The test is the definitive way to guage the OCI.

Any synthetic 5w40 HDEO (Heavy Duty Engine Oil) will be superior to a Dexos 2 oil. HDEOs have additional additives (like ZDDP and Molybdenum) which offer extra protection for our 2.8 LWN. The extra viscosity of a 5w40 or 0w40 is also beneficial while the engine is under a heavy load (like towing). Some of these additives are metallic and may not be emissions system friendly, however I think the issue is mostly political and not a problem if you take preventative measures and limit oil ingestion through the CCV system.

I'm using CJ-4 Delvac ESP as I have a stash of this oil. I was never impressed with Rotella T6 as a synthetic HDEO, and I would not use it without a catch-can as the volatility is high (as measured by PQIA).

I have been using a non-approved oil for over 8K miles with great results. My last oil analysis is posted here.
 

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You say you have a stash of the oil, do they not produce it anymore? I would be interested in running a more protective oil if you are having the good results that you are having.
 

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You say you have a stash of the oil, do they not produce it anymore? I would be interested in running a more protective oil if you are having the good results that you are having.
Yeah Mobil doesn’t make the CJ-4 version of Delvac ESP anymore. It was overbuilt for its intended purpose, made from PAO and Ester base oils. That is also what made it stable and gave it very low volatility. I bought 20 gallons of it in 2015.

When Mobil rolled out the new CK-4 version of Delvac ESP in 2017 they cheapened the formula and now use lower quality base oils. The current version is inferior to what it used to be...
 

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What would you recommend or go to then, when say you run out of your stockpile.

Sorry for hijacking the OP's thread.
I’m gonna try something else on the next oil change. It’s fun to sample different stuff and run the analysis. I think it’ll be Renewable Lubricants CJ-4 15w40. https://renewablelube.com/

I’d also like to try Ravenol NDT 5w40, John Deere 0w40 and Joe Gibbs DP40. All of those oils look like quality products.
 

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I have been using Amsoil products for about 7 years. Before that I used Mobile 1 synthetic. Amsoil grease is good, too. John Deere has good products, too.

Have been using this for about 6 or 7 years, for fuel system: http://b3cfuel.com/products/diesel-mechanic-in-a-bottle

It is my understanding that the Colorado does not do post injection for regeneration like most others, but instead injects into the exhaust. Hope this is true so that the engine oil is not diluted as the others when they do regeneration using the engine injectors.
 

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I have been using Amsoil products for about 7 years. Before that I used Mobile 1 synthetic. Amsoil grease is good, too. John Deere has good products, too.

Have been using this for about 6 or 7 years, for fuel system: http://b3cfuel.com/products/diesel-mechanic-in-a-bottle

It is my understanding that the Colorado does not do post injection for regeneration like most others, but instead injects into the exhaust. Hope this is true so that the engine oil is not diluted as the others when they do regeneration using the engine injectors.
That fuel additive emulsifies water which is not good for our trucks or any modern HPCR fueled diesel. Water is very destructive for the injection pump and injectors.

Water is a contaminant and is supposed to be removed in the filter assembly.

The other claims by that product are also dubious and not very impressive IMO.

Stick with a known additive formula that improves fuel, de-emulsifies water and properly protects the fuel system.

- Stanadyne performance formula
- Stanadyne warm wheather blend
- Amalgamed TDR-FL
- Amalgamated TDR-WDA

And yes our trucks have a 5th injector. It’s mounted on the DPF and sprays fuel directly into the filter. You can see it if you climb under the truck and look.
 

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That fuel additive emulsifies water which is not good for our trucks or any modern HPCR fueled diesel. Water is very destructive for the injection pump and injectors.

Water is a contaminant and is supposed to be removed in the filter assembly.

The other claims by that product are also dubious and not very impressive IMO.

Stick with a known additive formula that improves fuel, de-emulsifies water and properly protects the fuel system.

- Stanadyne performance formula
- Stanadyne warm wheather blend
- Amalgamed TDR-FL
- Amalgamated TDR-WDA

And yes our trucks have a 5th injector. It’s mounted on the DPF and sprays fuel directly into the filter. You can see it if you climb under the truck and look.
The DPF being the last in the string of the exhaust as shown here? https://gm.oemdtc.com/5670/new-model-features-2016-chevrolet-colorado-gmc-canyon/11
This link showing and explaining the exhaust system is possibly incorrect.

I thought it was injected further forward into the exhaust, but it does make good sense to inject it right where it is needed.

Just found this video:

https://www.bing.com/videos/search?q=Diesel+fuel+additive+comparison+by+SwRI&view=detail&mid=BC3174F922B8BA190CACBC3174F922B8BA190CAC&FORM=VIRE

I have used several different additives, including two of the Stanadyne products. For my Silverado I used two products, one for the water in the fuel system and one to lubricate. I worked at a company called SwRI, Southwest Research Institute that ran a test on several of the popular fuel additives and the more expensive additives did not perform any better than the less expensive. The Amsoil brand did not fair very well. I looked for that study online, but did not find it. I think this study was more about lubricity than anything else. MIB adds a little Cetane. I think I remember that some or one of the engineers from Seafoam started MIB company.

Found this online just now: https://www.bing.com/videos/search?q=Mechanic+in+the+bottle&view=detail&mid=999BA1DA69C1FDDCC30E999BA1DA69C1FDDCC30E&FORM=VIRE

At one time I questioned the value of MIB and asked Michael Goad. He sent me a fact sheet and below is the first paragraph:

Fuel Stabilization (Antioxidant Package): Conforms to military specifications (Mil-T-5624P
and ASTM D 1655). DMIB controls gum and peroxide formation in all diesel fuels, stopping the
formation of oxidation and asphaltenes. This is the highest standard of protection for any diesel
fuel in storage (i.e. generators).

In an email reply Michael wrote:

Diesel Mechanic In A Bottle does contain a cetane booster and a synthetic lubricant. It will also help reduce the number of regenerative burns the engine will need to go through.

The real truth is difficult to find. Don't know who to trust when it comes to sales folks. I purchased some bad diesel fuel during winter time in Colorado and suspect that had I not been using an additive, my injectors would have been damaged. I agree, the job of the fuel filter is to catch the dirt and water. I think I got some much water one time it overwhelmed my fuel filter.
 

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That fuel additive emulsifies water which is not good for our trucks or any modern HPCR fueled diesel. Water is very destructive for the injection pump and injectors.

Water is a contaminant and is supposed to be removed in the filter assembly.

The other claims by that product are also dubious and not very impressive IMO.

Stick with a known additive formula that improves fuel, de-emulsifies water and properly protects the fuel system.

- Stanadyne performance formula
- Stanadyne warm wheather blend
- Amalgamed TDR-FL
- Amalgamated TDR-WDA

And yes our trucks have a 5th injector. It’s mounted on the DPF and sprays fuel directly into the filter. You can see it if you climb under the truck and look.
We still have cold weather so I will climb under the truck and look when it warms up a little. My understanding is the last large object in the exhaust system has 3 functions; two related to emissions and one to muffle sound. The DPF is restrictive enough to act as a muffler. Not sure GM gave us a discount for no muffler. The cost of this emission system is about the same as upgrading from gasoline to diesel engine. The service departments like these expensive emission systems - job security.

I have a weed trimmer, chain saw, tiller, etc, and they were in storage for years. I left gasoline in their tanks and added about 1 ounce of MIB. Got the chain saw out of storage after about 3 or 4 years of not being used. Pulled on it 5 times and it started and ran like new. I'm not sure if it would have cranked this easily or at all, without a gasoline stabilizer.
 

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The DPF being the last in the string of the exhaust as shown here? https://gm.oemdtc.com/5670/new-model-features-2016-chevrolet-colorado-gmc-canyon/11
This link showing and explaining the exhaust system is possibly incorrect.

I thought it was injected further forward into the exhaust, but it does make good sense to inject it right where it is needed.

Just found this video:

https://www.bing.com/videos/search?q=Diesel+fuel+additive+comparison+by+SwRI&view=detail&mid=BC3174F922B8BA190CACBC3174F922B8BA190CAC&FORM=VIRE

I have used several different additives, including two of the Stanadyne products. For my Silverado I used two products, one for the water in the fuel system and one to lubricate. I worked at a company called SwRI, Southwest Research Institute that ran a test on several of the popular fuel additives and the more expensive additives did not perform any better than the less expensive. The Amsoil brand did not fair very well. I looked for that study online, but did not find it. I think this study was more about lubricity than anything else. MIB adds a little Cetane. I think I remember that some or one of the engineers from Seafoam started MIB company.

Found this online just now: https://www.bing.com/videos/search?q=Mechanic+in+the+bottle&view=detail&mid=999BA1DA69C1FDDCC30E999BA1DA69C1FDDCC30E&FORM=VIRE

At one time I questioned the value of MIB and asked Michael Goad. He sent me a fact sheet and below is the first paragraph:

Fuel Stabilization (Antioxidant Package): Conforms to military specifications (Mil-T-5624P
and ASTM D 1655). DMIB controls gum and peroxide formation in all diesel fuels, stopping the
formation of oxidation and asphaltenes. This is the highest standard of protection for any diesel
fuel in storage (i.e. generators).

In an email reply Michael wrote:

Diesel Mechanic In A Bottle does contain a cetane booster and a synthetic lubricant. It will also help reduce the number of regenerative burns the engine will need to go through.

The real truth is difficult to find. Don't know who to trust when it comes to sales folks. I purchased some bad diesel fuel during winter time in Colorado and suspect that had I not been using an additive, my injectors would have been damaged. I agree, the job of the fuel filter is to catch the dirt and water. I think I got some much water one time it overwhelmed my fuel filter.
There are two injectors in the exhaust. One for DEF and the other for fuel. The DEF injector is closest to the engine and the diesel fuel injector is farther down, after the SCR catalyst. It may be mounted in the section of pipe separating the two systems or on the inlet of the DPF. I don’t remember the exact location but it’s visible. GM was the 1st to pioneer the extra injector for regeneration of the DPF and it a great idea. The fuel dilution that plagued early DPF equipped diesels is virtually eliminated.

Lubricity isn’t as critical in modern HPCR diesels as they are designed for dry ULSD. I would say it’s helps upper cylinder lubrication which is one of the reasons why I use it. But it’s not a critical factor for the injector pump and injectors themselves like the older diesels.

The other reasons to use an additive:
- De-emulsify water so it can be removed by filtration.
- Improve combustion by raising cetane and using smoke suppressants. The poorer quality fuels will have a greater improvement with 2-EHN and combustion improvers than higher quality fuel.
- improve stability of fuel.
- improve detergent and dispersant characteristics of fuel.
- lower plugging point of fuel filter in winter.

Modern vehicles have plastic fuel tanks and SS fuel system components so corrosion protection isn’t as critical as it was in older diesels.
 

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There are two injectors in the exhaust. One for DEF and the other for fuel. The DEF injector is closest to the engine and the diesel fuel injector is farther down, after the SCR catalyst. It may be mounted in the section of pipe separating the two catalysts or on the inlet of the DPF. I don’t remember the exact location but it’s visible. GM was the 1st to pioneer the extra injector for regeneration of the DPF and it a great idea. The fuel dilution that plagued early DPF equipped diesels is virtually eliminated.

Lubricity isn’t as critical in modern HPCR diesels as they are designed for dry ULSD. I would say it’s helps upper cylinder lubrication which is one of the reasons why I use it. Buts it’s not a critical factor for the injector pump and injectors themselves like the older diesels.

The other reasons to use an additive:
- De-emulsify water so it can be removed by filtration.
- Improve combustion by raising cetane and using smoke suppressants. The poorer quality fuels will have a greater improvement with 2-EHN and combustion improvers than higher quality fuel.
- improve stability of fuel.
- improve detergent and dispersant characteristics of fuel.
- lower plugging point of fuel filter in winter.

Modern vehicles have plastic fuel tanks and SS fuel system components so corrosion protection isn’t as critical as it was in older diesels.
Yep, I'm thankful GM invented the extra injector for regeneration. That is one of the main reasons I disabled the regeneration in my old truck. Amsoil put out a statement several years ago about regeneration and dilution. Dilution really bothered me. Plastic and synthetic rubber are still affected by alcohol, so it's a good thing they don't put alcohol in diesel. I use only non-alcohol gasoline in my gasoline engines because I have experienced problems with alcohol.

I use additives for most or all of the reasons you listed. With additive, especially in my old truck I sold, I noticed more power, smoother acceleration, less smoke, and about 1mpg better fuel mileage. Keeping the mass airflow sensor clean helped, too. My old truck was used and came with a Raid oil type air filter. I replaced it with the GM OEM and it ran better. The GM OEM filter removes a lot of dust. One thing OEM I did not like so much were the batteries (not the fault of the batteries). Since it had two batteries and in different locations, one got overcharged and one undercharged. This was fine for a while, but eventually the one near the firewall starting bubbling out acid. Then I had to take out the battery and battery holder, clean off the corrosion, paint with a chemical rust stopper, and then paint with good enamel anti-rust paint. I went to the store, bought two AGM batteries and never had this issue again.

Next warm day, I will crawl around under my truck and locate as much as I can. I would like to hook up wires from the sensors and bring them inside the truck so I can use my oscilloscope to see all the voltages while driving around. Might be difficult to connect wires without damage to insulation. I would like to have a baseline of all the sensor readings while they are good so in the future and after warranty expires, I may be able to find a bad sensor, easier. Of course, buying and using the OEM shop manual would work, too. I might trade right before warranty expires.
 

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Yep, I'm thankful GM invented the extra injector for regeneration. That is one of the main reasons I disabled the regeneration in my old truck. Amsoil put out a statement several years ago about regeneration and dilution. Dilution really bothered me. Plastic and synthetic rubber are still affected by alcohol, so it's a good thing they don't put alcohol in diesel. I use only non-alcohol gasoline in my gasoline engines because I have experienced problems with alcohol.

I use additives for most or all of the reasons you listed. With additive, especially in my old truck I sold, I noticed more power, smoother acceleration, less smoke, and about 1mpg better fuel mileage. Keeping the mass airflow sensor clean helped, too. My old truck was used and came with a Raid oil type air filter. I replaced it with the GM OEM and it ran better. The GM OEM filter removes a lot of dust. One thing OEM I did not like so much were the batteries (not the fault of the batteries). Since it had two batteries and in different locations, one got overcharged and one undercharged. This was fine for a while, but eventually the one near the firewall starting bubbling out acid. Then I had to take out the battery and battery holder, clean off the corrosion, paint with a chemical rust stopper, and then paint with good enamel anti-rust paint. I went to the store, bought two AGM batteries and never had this issue again.

Next warm day, I will crawl around under my truck and locate as much as I can. I would like to hook up wires from the sensors and bring them inside the truck so I can use my oscilloscope to see all the voltages while driving around. Might be difficult to connect wires without damage to insulation. I would like to have a baseline of all the sensor readings while they are good so in the future and after warranty expires, I may be able to find a bad sensor, easier. Of course, buying and using the OEM shop manual would work, too. I might trade right before warranty expires.
Might be able to identify sensor locations by unplugging one at the time (if that's possible) and see what trouble code appears. Make a record of the location and trouble code for the future, just in case. The GM block diagram is useful for locating most of the sensors and their function, but obviously, not the fault code for each.
 
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