Chevy Colorado Diesel Forum banner
1 - 5 of 5 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My father purchased a 2018 Colorado diesel when it first came out. He bought it to use as a vehicle in all seasons as well to place a plow on it for the snowy winters. The truck has had several problems. The 1500 dollar apiece struts in the back of the truck went out within a 1000 miles, and they still aren't quite right. The shifter jammed and had to be replaced. The fuel pump rusted out this year for a bill of $3500 dollars to replace. Extended warranty did not pay for it and Chevy actually sent an independent person to check to see why the pump failed (it rusted out and wasn't covered under the warranty). My dad spends 150-200 dollars each year to have it sprayed at Rust Check. No rust on the body, but apparently it rusted to the fuel pump. I don't know how many times the check engine light has gone on--a sensor here, a sensor there. His biggest complaint is that during the winter, the truck is nearly undriveable. With the plow on, the check engine light always comes on. He cannot drive over 45 mph on the highway without taking it off, and still if the front grille ices or gets snow on it, the light will come on in truly bad weather. What happens if he goes over 45mph? It burns out the sensor. The dealership has tried adjusting the fuel/air ratio on the computer, but eventually gave up after several attempts. I vividly remember attempting a pass on a 2 lane road after one of the adjustments--we almost didn't make it with the pedal to the floor. I wish the truck was recalled. Countless emails to Chevy with zero results and given the runaround. I suppose this truck is better suited for more temperate weather, however; it should be designed to work pretty much the same in all climates. The one thing that we both like is the navigation system. It's much better than my Toyota's wonky app based nav system. He has asked the dealership if there was anything he could do about it. The response was to take the plow off for highway driving which is not probable when it frequently snows especially after going on a trip to find a foot of snow or more in the driveway to shovel out the plow. His old gasoline powered Colorado did not have these problems and was quite reliable both with and without the plow. Anybody else have this problem, and/or know if there any practical fixes? My father likes the truck despite these problems, but would like to have it work with a plow attached especially during emergencies.

Thanks,

Dan
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I stopped reading and couldn’t continue after half way down.
I'm sorry about that, I was trying to put in some good things about it as well. I was hoping that that the sensor that trips the intake air being blocked could be either removed or rerouted. I tried to get him to move to Florida then the problem would be fixed. 🤣
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
17 Posts
So your first post goes on to tell us issues with your dad's truck.
Well first off there are no rear struts on his truck.
Also , how is an internal fuel pump rusting in diesel fuel.
Lots of guys with plows here on the twins, no issues.
I know you love your Toyota, but get facts straight, before making up stories about GM trucks.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
661 Posts
So your first post goes on to tell us issues with your dad's truck.
Well first off there are no rear struts on his truck.
Also , how is an internal fuel pump rusting in diesel fuel.
Lots of guys with plows here on the twins, no issues.
I know you love your Toyota, but get facts straight, before making up stories about GM trucks.
HAHA Smoke, as soon as I saw the $1500 strut each on a solid axle I moved on....
 
1 - 5 of 5 Posts
Top