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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Recently (about 3 tanks) I've been using Renewable due to my local 76 now has it. I have never used it before..

I also add Diesel Kleen (silver) religiously .

Since using the renewable I've noticed my MPG drop to around 20, about 2-4 less than usual.

Both city and hi-way, no unusual driving..

Anybody using this stuff and any comments?
 

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Biodiesel has about 9% less BTUs per gallon compared to conventional diesel, so seeing roughly a 9% reduction in fuel economy is to be expected.
 

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I routinely use B20 in my Canyon and a previous Colorado. My average mpg drops 1-2 mpg (you can see my fuel logs on Fuelly) The BioDiesel is a better lubricant but definitely not as efficient. Have been using BioDiesel for years up to 50% in diesel sailboat motors over the years, the oil analysis show the benefits of using BioDiesel, plus the exhaust smells like McDonalds :)
 

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Biodiesel has about 9% less BTUs per gallon compared to conventional diesel, so seeing roughly a 9% reduction in fuel economy is to be expected.
The 76 Renewable Diesel is not BioDiesel. It is made out refined BioMass.
I use this Renewable Diesel 90% of the time (from Propel or 76). Started a 4k now at 54k.
 

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The 76 Renewable Diesel is not BioDiesel. It is made out refined BioMass.
I use this Renewable Diesel 90% of the time (from Propel or 76). Started a 4k now at 54k.
LOL, did you even read what you posted? "It's not BioDiesel, it's made out of refined BIOmass."


All our refineries producing renewables are technically capable of running on 100% waste and residue raw materials. We reached this capability already in 2015.

Waste and residues in Neste's raw material portfolio:

  • animal fat from food industry waste
  • used cooking oil
  • vegetable oil processing waste and residues (e.g., palm fatty acid distillate, spent bleaching earth oil, palm effluent sludge)
  • fish fat from fish processing waste
  • tall oil based raw materials
  • technical corn oil (a residue from ethanol production)
Biodiesel and renewable diesel are biomass-based biofuels

Biomass-based diesel fuels used as petroleum distillate fuel oil (diesel fuel and heating oil) include biodiesel and renewable diesel.
But it's not BioDiesel...ok...
 

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The term renewal diesel is BS. If diesel fuel is renewable then I should be able to collect fuel out of my exhaust pipe and re-use it.
What a crock of word game garbage with these green word using morons.
 

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The term renewal diesel is BS. If diesel fuel is renewable then I should be able to collect fuel out of my exhaust pipe and re-use it.
What a crock of word game garbage with these green word using morons.
Yeah, there's nothing renewable about the fuel itself. They should've called it "sustainable diesel" or something, but I understand they may not be able to call it BioDiesel for one reason or another as there are 2 different ASTM standards at play, one for BioDiesel and one for "Renewable Diesel." On the surface of it, the biggest difference is that BioDiesel can be blended with conventional diesel but "Renewable Diesel" doesn't need to be blended. Again, wordplay because what's the real difference in those statements other than wording? One would have to dig into the ASTM docs to weed out what the actual, chemical differences are between the standards. BioDiesel or Renewable Diesel, I find it unlikely that there is much difference between B100 and 100% Renewable Diesel.
 
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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
The term renewal diesel is BS. If diesel fuel is renewable then I should be able to collect fuel out of my exhaust pipe and re-use it.
What a crock of word game garbage with these green word using morons.
Yep... We all know these groups that we must appease...... and maybe it just takes those "special" words to accomplish that.....
 

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Witch one has the best lubricating qualities
Any price difference
What about viscosity? Is one thicker than the other?

I have heard of bio diesel but never seen renewable diesel.
 

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Biodiesel has about 9% less BTUs per gallon compared to conventional diesel, so seeing roughly a 9% reduction in fuel economy is to be expected.
The mileage reduction I could believe. But it would be possible for sensors in our engine to change fuel injection to keep the power. Do they? As a practical matter, I stay within the Chevy spec and wouldn't know the difference, but I'm curious.
 

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The mileage reduction I could believe. But it would be possible for sensors in our engine to change fuel injection to keep the power. Do they? As a practical matter, I stay within the Chevy spec and wouldn't know the difference, but I'm curious.
There's no way for the "sensors" to detect the fuel being used, so no the tune can't just adjust for bio%. It's not like the E85/flex fuel engines that have a sensor that is able to detect the ethanol%.
 

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There's no way for the "sensors" to detect the fuel being used, so no the tune can't just adjust for bio%. It's not like the E85/flex fuel engines that have a sensor that is able to detect the ethanol%.
No need for a sensor that could find bio%. An engine torque sensor or a cylinder pressure sensor could easily be used to change fuel injection rates, if either were short of what was expected for that r/m and foot feed setting. After all, these have already been mapped. And I'm guessing that we already have a fuel use meter, since there is no other way to output the instant fuel economy driver information choice. It would be technically easy. But. per my earlier post, I don't know exactly what sensor we have and don't have.
 

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No need for a sensor that could find bio%. An engine torque sensor or a cylinder pressure sensor could easily be used to change fuel injection rates, if either were short of what was expected for that r/m and foot feed setting. After all, these have already been mapped. And I'm guessing that we already have a fuel use meter, since there is no other way to output the instant fuel economy driver information choice. It would be technically easy. But. per my earlier post, I don't know exactly what sensor we have and don't have.
In theory something like that might work, but there are just too many variables involved to make the determination about power/torque/fuel and adjusting for bio%.
  • Boost
  • Ambient temp
  • IAT
  • Fuel cetane number (This is a big one as cetane has a noticeable effect on throttle response and burn efficiency/fuel economy)
  • Elevation to a certain degree (atmospheric pressure, though the atmospheric pressure sensor built into the MAP sensor should make this a non-issue)
I just don't see any way for the ECM to be able to determine that a deviation in power/torque or fuel consumption is specifically due to bio% and no other factor. That is why FlexFuel engines have an ethanol sensor, it's easy to figure out the ethanol% that way vs trying to determine it based on various changes in actual engine performance.
 
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