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... The line from the CCV to the turbo has the air /oil separator filter installed. So there is a small restriction in that line. It must be just enough because it has not triggered a check engine light.

... When I first was playing with the CCV hose I dissconnected it from the turbo and the truck threw a check engine light. I can’t remember if I had it blocked or not. Ether way the computer picked up on the fact the line was disconnected.

Now with the small restriction in the line caused by the air/oil filter separator there is no check engine light. Even though there is a T in the hose between the engine and the separator. So the small restriction seems to be working.

Rob
A few thoughts:

The electrical dealio at the CCV hose connection to the turbo is a heater placed there to prevent ice from forming. Obviously it does an inadequate job as some owners in cold and wet climates (pretty much anywhere there is real winter) have suffered bent turbo fins.

If the inlet for the CCV hose to the turbo is securely capped off, it will not throw a code, and you can run the CCV hose open to the atmosphere (the Jeep CRD guys called this the "Elephant Hose Mod") or a suitable air/oil separator. I like this idea as there is no possibility of bent turbo fins. The downside is oil dripping from an open vent hose, which your separator addresses. The main thing with the separator is it can't freeze up or otherwise block off the flow or you risk pressurizing the crankcase and blowing oil past the rear main seal, or, worse yet, blowing out the seal itself.

Deleted guys will weld in an angled bung into their exhaust pipe and the exhaust flow will scavenge the oil line, actually creating a suction effect. A bit of oil in a plain exhaust pipe never hurt anything. Emissions intact system would have to have the bung after the DPF, and that would make for a very long and possibly freeze prone hose.

The turbo inlet never really "sucks" on that end, it is all positive pressure from the valve cover. My truck's "dirty hose" to the catch can runs uphill at a decent angle and I still get a good amount of oil in my Provent 200. I chose to go with the Provent as worst case scenario, the element in the catch can freezes and the relief flapper valve in the cap spooges oil out. That has not happened to me to date, but Colorado is super dry, even in winter. Having some sort of relief valve in case things freeze up seems pretty critical though.

Anyway, if you choose to, there is no reason you can't cap off the CCV inlet to the turbo and run an open vent hose. The trick is dealing with the oil that drips from the hose, there is a decent amount of it.

I like the air/oil separator idea, but make sure it can't freeze up, or that it has some sort of pressure relief valve in it. Given your setup, I think you can cap off the turbo inlet and not use it. That way there is no way ice or water can get into the turbo, a great thing :cool:
 

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Discussion Starter #24
A few thoughts:

The electrical dealio at the CCV hose connection to the turbo is a heater placed there to prevent ice from forming. Obviously it does an inadequate job as some owners in cold and wet climates (pretty much anywhere there is real winter) have suffered bent turbo fins.

If the inlet for the CCV hose to the turbo is securely capped off, it will not throw a code, and you can run the CCV hose open to the atmosphere (the Jeep CRD guys called this the "Elephant Hose Mod") or a suitable air/oil separator. I like this idea as there is no possibility of bent turbo fins. The downside is oil dripping from an open vent hose, which your separator addresses. The main thing with the separator is it can't freeze up or otherwise block off the flow or you risk pressurizing the crankcase and blowing oil past the rear main seal, or, worse yet, blowing out the seal itself.

Deleted guys will weld in an angled bung into their exhaust pipe and the exhaust flow will scavenge the oil line, actually creating a suction effect. A bit of oil in a plain exhaust pipe never hurt anything. Emissions intact system would have to have the bung after the DPF, and that would make for a very long and possibly freeze prone hose.

The turbo inlet never really "sucks" on that end, it is all positive pressure from the valve cover. My truck's "dirty hose" to the catch can runs uphill at a decent angle and I still get a good amount of oil in my Provent 200. I chose to go with the Provent as worst case scenario, the element in the catch can freezes and the relief flapper valve in the cap spooges oil out. That has not happened to me to date, but Colorado is super dry, even in winter. Having some sort of relief valve in case things freeze up seems pretty critical though.

Anyway, if you choose to, there is no reason you can't cap off the CCV inlet to the turbo and run an open vent hose. The trick is dealing with the oil that drips from the hose, there is a decent amount of it.

I like the air/oil separator idea, but make sure it can't freeze up, or that it has some sort of pressure relief valve in it. Given your setup, I think you can cap off the turbo inlet and not use it. That way there is no way ice or water can get into the turbo, a great thing :cool:
Very good read.
I did throw a code when I was first messing with this idea. I had the hose blocked off and the CCV vented just under the hood.
That was a mistake as the stink that came into the truck was very strong.
I cant Remember how I caused the code. But it had something to do with that heater or sensor.
Dont forget the CCV hose is connected to the inlet of the turbo so any restriction between the air filter and the turbo causes vacuum on that CCV hose.

So I figured somehow that heater was a vacuum sensor too.

Something else I found out..
Even though I cleared the code its still in the ECU in a code history file... That sucks..

Rob
 

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I don't think the heater senses anything other than possibly temperature. Could be wrong, but that is what I have read from others who have done the "elephant hose mod".

Definitely want the "cap" at the CCV inlet at the turbo to be well conceived and secure, as an air leak at the turbo would definitely cause a code and be bad in general. I am a fan of the good ole Redneck stick a hose in it with a big tightly fitting bolt screwed into it with a clamp on it method. ;)
 

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Discussion Starter #26
I don't think the heater senses anything other than possibly temperature. Could be wrong, but that is what I have read from others who have done the "elephant hose mod".

Definitely want the "cap" at the CCV inlet at the turbo to be well conceived and secure, as an air leak at the turbo would definitely cause a code and be bad in general. I am a fan of the good ole Redneck stick a hose in it with a big tightly fitting bolt screwed into it with a clamp on it method. ;)
The hose and bolt lol... Me too.
When I get a chance I will block the inlet hose to the turbo and remove my air/oil separator.
I need to see how much oil is in there.
i will leave the hose with the heater on it but block the other end.

Rob
 

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I am a fan of the good ole Redneck stick a hose in it with a big tightly fitting bolt screwed into it with a clamp on it method. ;)
hahaha, I remember as a kid using an old spark plug to plug up the heater hoses on my 68 Chevelle when my heater core was leaking.

I think I may try this mod. I'm not worried about having a stored code if it throws one since I'll just hook everything back up and clear the code.
 
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