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I want a travel trailer so bad it's not funny! That said, it's impressive what you're towing for sure. Towing my 14' enclosed cargo trailer with 1000# of cargo is like towing a 2500# kite, the 2.8 doesn't complain but I know it's there... my hunch is I could toss another 1000# in and not notice much difference, the wind resistance is the biggest part of what I'm feeling.
 

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Just purchased and can't see around it at all. Seriously need more options for tow mirrors and such. I like the idea of the Intellihaul mirrors and such, but believe the price is just too much to consider. View attachment 7713
I just installed the Boost. Irrors for $325 and free shipping. The discount code does not work but the mirrors are awesome and you won’t have problems seeing.
 

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Escape 5.0TA.jpg


Escape 5.0 TA camper. About 4400# and high/wide is just a bit too much on grades and for my '15 gasser so the '19 diesel is on the way.
The awesome lightweight removable Andersen Ultimate goose-neck hitch on a permanent rail mount has about 650# pin weight.
Will install a couple of parts to the Max: Racor catch can; S&B cold air filter; AFE intercooler in/out pipes, Boost mirrors.
This is my last truck and my next wheeled vehicle will likely be pushed by a nurse.
 

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Nice setup. Looks good. The Anderson Ultimate hitch you mentioned, was it something custom built or is it something that can be readily ordered for our trucks?
 

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Nice setup. Looks good. The Anderson Ultimate hitch you mentioned, was it something custom built or is it something that can be readily ordered for our trucks?
Had this installed via a rail mount in Canada where the camper is built but can be bought on line. There's You Tube on installation. It's quiet, no lube, and allows very tight turns.
http://www.hitchsource.com/andersen-ultimate-hitch-c-24_315_362.html?utm_content=Ultimate 5th Wheel&utm_term=andersen ultimate 5th wheel connection&utm_campaign=Andersen Hitches&utm_medium=cpc&utm_source=bing&ag=Ultimate_5thWheel&cn=Andersen_Hitches&pn=8554532302
Your kingpin is covered by the red receiver which grabs the ball.
http://www.hitchsource.com/andersen-ultimate-hitch-rail-version-p-35158.html
 

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View attachment 8033

Escape 5.0 TA camper. About 4400# and high/wide is just a bit too much on grades and for my '15 gasser so the '19 diesel is on the way.
The awesome lightweight removable Andersen Ultimate goose-neck hitch on a permanent rail mount has about 650# pin weight.
Will install a couple of parts to the Max: Racor catch can; S&B cold air filter; AFE intercooler in/out pipes, Boost mirrors.
This is my last truck and my next wheeled vehicle will likely be pushed by a nurse.
Dang, I’m going to have to give a second look. Have to try a different rv place. Last guy told me it couldn’t be done. Now I’m seeing yours...
 

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My 2016 and Fun Finder Travel Trailer
 

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Had this installed via a rail mount in Canada where the camper is built but can be bought on line. There's You Tube on installation. It's quiet, no lube, and allows very tight turns.
http://www.hitchsource.com/andersen-ultimate-hitch-c-24_315_362.html?utm_content=Ultimate 5th Wheel&utm_term=andersen ultimate 5th wheel connection&utm_campaign=Andersen Hitches&utm_medium=cpc&utm_source=bing&ag=Ultimate_5thWheel&cn=Andersen_Hitches&pn=8554532302
Your kingpin is covered by the red receiver which grabs the ball.
http://www.hitchsource.com/andersen-ultimate-hitch-rail-version-p-35158.html
Hi Bobbo. We've got an identical setup, but did it a year earlier. We've put ~20000 miles on towing, and the combination is the best of the half dozen or so we've had over the last 40 years. And like you, it's our last, best truck. But we're keeping it super maintained and stock as a rock, for just that reason. I have no problem pulling the loaded 5.0TA up hills and on not so great roads, but want to stay within it's engineered limits.

How are your mirrors working? We went ahead and shelled cash for the Clearview Australian, powered, heated, mirrors and have never looked back. The fold in quite easily, look fine, and you'll never have to pull over to manually readjust droopy mirrors. This is definitely something that GM should option...
 

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Here's our TT: A Winnebago 2108DS. It weighs about 4,000 lbs. dry. I just got done adjusting my Equal-i-zer WDH for the Colorado. Previous tow vehicle was a 2008 Grand Cherokee CRD. We'll be taking it out on its first towing voyage next week.
Colo-bago.jpg
 

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Here's our TT: A Winnebago 2108DS. It weighs about 4,000 lbs. dry. I just got done adjusting my Equal-i-zer WDH for the Colorado. Previous tow vehicle was a 2008 Grand Cherokee CRD. We'll be taking it out on its first towing voyage next week. View attachment 8209
Thanks for posting and the pic. Looks like a great match. Is your Colorado a CCSB or CCLB? If CCSB, then this is an advantage for no bed hitch trailering. They turn tighter and look better. You don't need the extra bed length that makes a bed hitch work best. And as a bed hitch lover I can see the appeal of keeping all of your bed volume. Please keep us in the loop on your trip.
 

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"Think about a Colorado purchase actually use your truck as a truck".

RCD, do you share this view, or are you just passing it on? You seem to have found that the Colorado didn't meet your needs and found a good truck that did. That is smart. But here's my $0.02 on that last sentence:

What you need to "think about" is pushing/exceeding the numbers on ANY vehicle. Folks, next trip you take, count how many trucks, our size to Fedex size, are pulled off the road or accordioned in a ditch because they were "used as a truck".

Sollee, I'm with GM. Depending on how tall these "taller tires" are, that could just be a misdemeanor. But point is, our trucks were put together as SYSTEMS. Now, more than ever. Not saying that some components aren't improvable. But you need to consider how Mickey Mousing with one effects the others, and "taller tires" is a textbook example.

As for braking, intuitively, I would never tow more than 1000# without trailer brakes behind my Z71 CCLB. Maybe the rent trailer hydraulic brakes between 1000-1500#, but then e brakes for anything higher. So, I wouldn't even get close to what this fellow did. The closest "crowd" for me is payload rating, but even there, close, but not over.....
 

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Bought new travel trailer to replace our 5-year-old RPod. Rockwood Mini Lite 2109S was purchased after much research. Goals of new trailer--Larger fridge, at least as much water capacity as the RPOd (Yep!), hopefully move generators to rear bumper so they don't need to be moved around and of course towable by Colorado. Took it on a short trip to the Uinta Mountains of Utah. Plenty of hill climbing and descents. Truck did pretty good, really like the exhaust brake and downshifting feature. Looking forward to getting it out more.
 

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Discussion Starter #139
"Think about a Colorado purchase actually use your truck as a truck".

RCD, do you share this view, or are you just passing it on? You seem to have found that the Colorado didn't meet your needs and found a good truck that did. That is smart. But here's my $0.02 on that last sentence:

What you need to "think about" is pushing/exceeding the numbers on ANY vehicle. Folks, next trip you take, count how many trucks, our size to Fedex size, are pulled off the road or accordioned in a ditch because they were "used as a truck".

Sollee, I'm with GM. Depending on how tall these "taller tires" are, that could just be a misdemeanor. But point is, our trucks were put together as SYSTEMS. Now, more than ever. Not saying that some components aren't improvable. But you need to consider how Mickey Mousing with one effects the others, and "taller tires" is a textbook example.

As for braking, intuitively, I would never tow more than 1000# without trailer brakes behind my Z71 CCLB. Maybe the rent trailer hydraulic brakes between 1000-1500#, but then e brakes for anything higher. So, I wouldn't even get close to what this fellow did. The closest "crowd" for me is payload rating, but even there, close, but not over.....
I just came across the post. I don’t know the person. Looking at the terrain and the truck I’d bet he was hitting some whoops or something to cause that failure. Gm shouldn’t foot the bill although I did think the frame looked weenie, especially in that area

But, yes, I tend to share his opinion. I know that hurts feelings around here but I haven’t been banned yet so I think I’m still allowed to have opinions.
 

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On the bent frame issue, when I first became interested in the Colorado / Canyon it was in conjunction to me looking for a wrecked “builder.” I like to buy totaled out nearly new vehicles and repair them to serve as daily drivers. I don’t care if my personal vehicles have salvage titles as long as I know why it was given a salvage title and personally either do the repairs or oversee the repairs. I really liked to build Ford Ranger trucks before they stopped making them the first round. I bought one for my Dad and rebuilt it. I bought one myself (6 miles on it) that my best guess is it got damaged in transit from the factory, and one with 400 miles that the driver struck a deer. I am still amazed that one was totaled. There were others I bought to build and sell. I was always very honest about the history of the vehicles when I sold them.

I focused primarily on Ford Rangers that were struck in the rear. Why? The primary damage was to the bed (easy to remove and replace) and the frame which was easy to straighten with the bed off. Airbags were also not an issue in rear impacts. In my garage I would pull the bed off and then take it to the local shop that specialized in frame straightening. All that was in the early 2000’s before I got married and had a child. My endless hours in the garage went away after that and rebuilding wrecked trucks stopped.

Flash forward to 2016 and I decided I needed a new truck. Rangers were no longer in existence. I had a friend that worked in a body shop that owed me a good amount of money and was interested in paying me back in body shop labor and I had developed an affinity for small Diesel engines (I have 2 Land Rovers with 4 cylinder diesels). I looked around and decided the diesel Colorado would be the wrecked builder I would look to find.

Well, since the early 2000’s the prices for wrecked builders has changed a lot. I guess a lot more people are doing it. It made no sense to buy a builder when I could buy new off the lot for just a few thousand more than what it would cost to buy and repair a builder. So, that is what I did. My friend in the body shop paid me back by painting my Land Rovers...

So, back to the post topic. What I did notice in looking at wrecked Colorado and Canyon trucks that had been struck in the rear was 2 weak points. The rear bumper and mounts usually took most of the damage before it got into the frame in a major way. For the cases the damage made it to the frame, that point on the frame shown in the photo was usually where it buckled.

My assumption is both of those aspects were intentionally built and designed to absorb impact before it was transferred to the cab. As odd as I sounds, when I initially looked for a wrecked builder, I liked it due to the fact both repairs are relatively easy. Comparing them to the Ranger trucks of the early 2000s, I never noticed a common “weak” point in the frames of the Ranger trucks. Most of the frames I had straightened had bent to a parallelogram shape. I had one that I actually decided to the replace the frame instead of getting it straightened. It was quite an ordeal to get the cab mount bolts out due the binding caused. In all of them, there was only minimal buckling. I’d actually call it more “arching” than buckling in my experiences.

Now, in consideration of my current 2017 Canyon, I decided I didn’t like having such a weak rear bumper and replaced it with an HD aftermarket unit. If my truck is struck in the rear, I guess that particular section of the rear frame is going to take almost all of the impact as the bumper is much more beefy than the frame.

All that being said, if my frame buckles due to towing, I am not going to be happy. However, if it bends there and absorbs the impact of the rear end collision, I’d rather that take place than my body absorb the damage. Then, unless the price is ridiculous, I’ll pay the insurance company the salvage value and fix it. My body shop friend confirmed that it was an easy fix when I sent him photos of the wrecked builders I was considering.

Giving it more thought, as I have been in and under that Land Rover shown in my previous comment a lot due to carrying out a V8 auto conversion to diesel 4 cylinder and 5 speed, I have looked at the frame on it a lot. It is a lot more solid than the Canyon. However, it is also 20 years older. The technology Land Rover used is even older than that. It is based off of the Land Rover Series that became the very iconic Land Rover Defender with origins over 70 years old. I also have a 1988 Land Rover D90 (commonly called Defender) that had rusted out door bottoms. I bought doors removed from a 2013 Land Rover Defender that bolted right up with no modifications. I share that to illustrate how old the design is on those vehicles. They stopped selling the Defenders in the US in 1997 because they couldn’t meet US DOT safety standards without completely redesigning them.

That particular model, the one shown in my photo (Discovery), of Land Rover was the last one that was imported to the US that could really be considered an off road vehicle. It used the same drivetrain as the Defender - axles, engine, transmission, transfer case, and suspension with a very similar frame. In 1999 the Discovery 2 went into production and they began basically turning them into passenger vehicles, essentially expensive Ford Explorers. See the current 2019 Discovery for proof... yuck!!I believe Ford owned Land Rover at that time, lol.

For my personal and family’s safety, give me my 2017 Canyon (and its frame) every day I’m not off road. For off roading, give me my Land Rovers. For towing reasonable size trailers on the interstate, give me my Canyon. My Land Rovers and their 115 HP engines couldn’t begin to do the job of the Canyon. For towing a small trailer “off road” at lower speeds, give me my Land Rovers. My Land Rovers are great off road and do fine on road most of the time, but they are for many reasons my second choice on road. My analogy is my tool box, many of my tools have multiple uses. However, for a simple example, there is a reason I don’t use a 13 mm wrench for everything that a 13 mm wrench can be used for. Sometimes a socket is a better choice in getting the job done.

My only real complaint (so far) with my Canyon is the location of the headlight and transfer case switches. I bump them with my knees about once a month.
 
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