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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My wife is on a solo road trip in our 2017 Canyon with Duramax diesel. I’m an overkill guy for preventive maintenance. I thought the battery was turning over the engine a little slow in February and with the truck and battery being 4 years old I decided to swap out the battery for a new one. Everything was fine until my wife began her solo road trip. She stopped for a bathroom break about 400 miles in. She came back out and the engine turned over maybe one turn and then was done. Right at that point I got the onstar error message via email, “The battery in your 2017 GMC Canyon is critically low. Start your vehicle as soon as possible and let the engine run to charge the battery.”

No error messages were indicated before that in the DIC.

She got a jump start and continued 200 miles to the hotel. After arriving at the hotel it started right up. She called AAA who came out and tested the battery. Here are the results:
BATTERY TEST
GOOD & RECHARGE
The battery is not fully charged, but is considered to have useful life remaining. Charge per manufacturer’s specifications before returning to service.
State of Health: 100 %
State of Charge: 66 %
Voltage: 12.49 V
Battery Type: AGM SPIRAL
Set Capacity: 300 CCA/SAE
Measure Capacity: 662 CCA/SAE
OCV: 12.49

SYSTEM TEST
CRANKING VOLTS: 10.84 V NORMAL
ALT. IDLE VOLTS: 12.55 V LOW
ALT. LOAD VOLTS: 13.31 V NORMAL
DIODE RIPPLE: 0.08 V NORMAL
Click to expand...
I wanted them to replace the battery but they talked my wife out of it. I’m surprised they said nothing about the 66% state of charge.

So, the next morning it started right up. She went to Autozone and asked them to replace the battery. They tested the battery and charging system. Again, they told her everything is normal. All they said is the idle charge was initially low at 12.6 but it popped up to 13.1 quickly. But, as we know, that is likely normal for these computer controlled alternators.They also talked her out of replacing the battery.

She left Autozone with a very nice jump pack.

I explained to her how to check the charge in the DIC. It was up to 14.5 while driving.

With all systems seeming normal, she is back on the road. Im headed out to meet her with a new battery and alternator. I was surprised the new OEM alternator was only $180.

Anyone ever had such a weird occurrence, the battery charge dropping so low with no logical cause? She was driving on the interstate and only left the truck off for about 10 minutes.
 

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That's a tough one because it could be a faulty battery, alternator, hall effect sensor on the battery lead, ECM or BCM or a poor connection that maybe got disturbed when you changed out the original battery.
 

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Anyone ever had such a weird occurrence, the battery charge dropping so low with no logical cause? She was driving on the interstate and only left the truck off for about 10 minutes.
Not sure why the new battery went dead, that is weird.

The post jump start 66% SOC after driving 200 miles observed by AAA is pretty normal for the charging system on our trucks, which are designed to save fuel and not maximize battery life. We have had quite a few discussions about it.

The short of it is (to use a bad pun) the system will not fully charge the battery unless specific things are going on. If it is cold out, or the headlights are on (not the daylight running lights, the full headlights) the system will charge the battery fully. In most other circumstances, the system is "lazy" and will run the battery at 12.2V or less, then charge it at up to 15V if coasting or braking to capture the "free" energy in an effort to save a miniscule amount of fuel. One can observe this in the DIC as they drive.

I put LED bulbs in my '17 Canyon and drive it with the lights on if it is not cold out, still on the original battery and it is still strong. AGM batteries sulfate if not kept at a full charge, by using the headlights is a simple way to force the system to charge the battery fully. I also plug it into an Optimate power sports 1 amp smart charger if I am not going to drive it for awhile, had an extra one as I put a Lithium battery in my motorcycle. That keeps the battery nice and fully charged at 12.7V with a 13.5V (depending on temperature) sub 1 amp float charge. AGM batteries love this kind of treatment.

So yes, the 66% SOC that you observed, sadly is "normal". Lights on for safety and for longer battery life in these trucks.

Here is the full ridiculous way too much info copy and pasted from a thread on the COFans board on this topic. It all sounds good, but too many times I have been driving along and seen 12.2V (or less) in the DIC. Have left my house with a fully charged been on the tender for a week battery, only to return at 65% SOC (around 12.28V, measured at the terminals with a multi meter) that your wife observed. All this crap makes me miss the days of simple "dumb" voltage regulators that simply kept batteries fully charged, as I have incurred too much brain damage over this issue 😆

Charging System Operation

The purpose of the charging system is to maintain the battery charge and vehicle loads. There are 6 modes of operation and they include:
• Battery Sulfation Mode
• Charge Mode
• Fuel Economy Mode
• Head lamp Mode
• Start Up Mode
• Voltage Reduction Mode
The engine control module (ECM) controls the generator through the generator turn ON signal circuit. The ECM monitors the generator performance though the generator field duty cycle signal circuit. The signal is a pulse width modulation (PWM) signal of 128 Hz with a duty cycle of 0–100 percent. Normal duty cycle is between 5–95 percent. Between 0–5 percent and 95–100 percent are for diagnostic purposes. The following table shows the
commanded duty cycle and output voltage of the generator:

Commanded Duty Cycle Generator Output Voltage
10% 11 V
20% 11.56 V
30% 12.12 V
40% 12.68 V
50% 13.25 V
60% 13.81 V
70% 14.37 V
80% 14.94 V
90% 15.5 V
The generator provides a feedback signal of the generator voltage output through the generator field duty cycle signal circuit to the ECM. This information is sent to the body control module (BCM). The signal is PWM signal of 128 Hz with a duty cycle of 0–100 percent. Normal duty cycle is between 5–99 percent. Between 0–5 percent and 100 percent are for diagnostic purposes.

Battery Sulfation Mode

The BCM will enter this mode when the interpreted generator output voltage is less than 13.2 V for 45 minutes. When this condition exists the BCM will enter Charge Mode for 2–3 minutes. The BCM will then determine which mode to enter depending on voltage requirements.

Charge Mode
The BCM will enter Charge Mode when ever one of the following conditions are met.

• The wipers are ON for more than 3 seconds.
• GMLAN (Climate Control Voltage Boost Mode Request) is true, as sensed by the HVAC control head. High speed cooling fan, rear defogger and HVAC high speed blower operation can cause the BCM to enter the Charge
Mode.
• The estimated battery temperature is less than 0°C (32°F).
• Battery State of Charge is less than 80 percent.
• Vehicle speed is greater than 145 km/h (90 mph)
• Current sensor fault exists.
• System voltage was determined to be below 12.56 V
When any one of these conditions is met, the system will set targeted generator output voltage to a charging voltage between 13.9–15.5 V, depending on the battery state of charge and estimated battery temperature.

Fuel Economy Mode

The BCM will enter Fuel Economy Mode when the estimated battery temperature is at least 0°C (32°F) but less than or equal to 80°C (176°F), the calculated battery current is less than 15 amperes and greater than −8 amperes, and the battery state-of-charge is greater than or equal to 80 percent. Its targeted generator output voltage is the open circuit voltage of the battery and can be between 12.5–13.1 V. The BCM will exit this mode and enter Charge Mode when any of the conditions described above are present.

Head lamp Mode

The BCM will enter Head lamp Mode when ever the head lamps are ON (high or low beams). Voltage will be regulated between 13.9–14.5 V.

Startup Mode

When the engine is started the BCM sets a targeted generator output voltage of 14.5 V for 30 seconds.

Voltage Reduction Mode

The BCM will enter Voltage Reduction Mode when the calculated ambient air temperature is above 0°C (32°F). The calculated battery current is less than 1 ampere and greater than −7 amperes, and the generator field duty cycle is less than 99 percent. Its targeted generator output voltage is 12.9 V. The BCM will exit this mode once the criteria are met for Charge Mode.

Instrument Panel Cluster Operation

Charge Indicator Operation

The instrument panel cluster illuminates the charge indicator and displays a warning message in the driver information center if equipped, when the one or more of the following occurs:
• The engine control module (ECM) detects that the generator output is less than 11 V or greater than 16 V. The instrument panel cluster receives a GMLAN message from the ECM requesting illumination.
• The instrument panel cluster determines that the system voltage is less than 11 V or greater than 16 V for more than 30 seconds. The instrument panel cluster receives a GMLAN message from the body control module
(BCM) indicating there is a system voltage range concern.
• The instrument panel cluster performs the displays test at the start of each ignition cycle. The indicator illuminates for approximately 3 seconds.

Display Message: BATTERY NOT CHARGING SERVICE CHARGING SYSTEM or SERVICE BATTERY CHARGING SYSTEM
The BCM and the ECM will send a serial data message to the driver information center for the BATTERY NOT CHARGING SERVICE CHARGING SYSTEM or SERVICE BATTERY CHARGING SYSTEM message to be
displayed. It is commanded ON when a charging system DTC is a current DTC. The message is turned OFF when the conditions for clearing the DTC have been met.

Electrical Power Management Description and Operation

The electrical power management is used to monitor and control the charging system and alert the driver of possible problems within the charging system. The electrical power management system makes the most efficient use of the generator output, improves the battery state-of-charge, extends battery life, and manages system electrical loads.
The load shed operation is a means of reducing electrical loads during a low voltage or low battery state-of-charge condition.
The idle boost operation is a means of improving generator performance during a low voltage or low battery state-of-charge condition.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Pretty sure I figured this out. 1100 miles later I have joined my wife and our 2017 Canyon. I have purchased 2 new GM vehicles in the last 10 years. Both of them have left us stranded in the middle of long trips at less the 4 years old and less than 45,000 miles due to ridiculous issues that should not happneed.

I will post back in a few days once I have confirmed what went wrong. In a nutshell, it looks like it’s a loose connection to the engine fuse panel.
 

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Pretty sure I figured this out. 1100 miles later I have joined my wife and our 2017 Canyon. I have purchased 2 new GM vehicles in the last 10 years. Both of them have left us stranded in the middle of long trips at less the 4 years old and less than 45,000 miles due to ridiculous issues that should not happneed.

I will post back in a few days once I have confirmed what went wrong. In a nutshell, it looks like it’s a loose connection to the engine fuse panel.
I hope it is that simple. My battery disconnect issue turned out to be simple, but drove me crazy until I happened on the "real" problem!

Keep us informed and good luck!
 

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What did your problem end up being?
The disconnect switch was not making a complete connection to the battery negative terminal. The switch housing (aka "green knob") wrapped around the terminal, but the electrical connection was supposed to be made by screwing down on the "green knob".

The green knob, even when tightly screwed down, was failing to make a secure connection with the terminal, but the switch terminal clamp obscured that fact. I ended up getting a new type of disconnect and giving up on the "green knob". However that same green knob is now the battery disconnect on my Morgan (positive ground system) and working as it should.

Go figure!

9099
633807228.jpg
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 · (Edited)
So here is what I found when I first arrived. Turned the key and it weakly started to crank, maybe 1/4 a turn and then clicks. Reading that some had experienced a loose connection at the cable from battery to the main engine fuse panel, I pulled a little tension on that cable. I had the wife try to start it while I held tension. It still didn’t start but the engine clearly had more cranking power as it turned over a couple times. Hooked up the jump pack and it started right up. My multimeter, DIC, and charge system tester all agreed it was charging well. But, the battery was at 22% state of charge. Charged the battery back up on a slow charge for 4 hours and everything checked out fine with the battery. I took things apart expecting to find a loose connection. It wasn’t obviously loose. So, I disconnected it to see if there was arcing... nope. I checked the connections at the battery “junction” and all seemed good. I did get a little more tightening on that main cable from the battery to the fuse panel, but not much.

I changed the battery to a known good one (original 4 year old one I kept instead of turning it on for a core charge... I have an old Land Rover I was going to use it in that doesn’t get used much.) and drove it on several trips, short and as long as 26 miles one way. I drove down a steep mountain grade for 16 miles mostly in tow / haul mode to use the engine brake and pretty much off the accelerator pedal. I went back up the same grade with it off as well, always on the accelerator pedal. I kept an eye on the DIC and it never fell below 13.1. In tow haul mode it stayed above 14. Checked the battery when I got home and all was good. I left it overnight and the state of charge was 42%. It still started right up. Battery “state of health” was 97%.

Seeing as the problem has only fully shown its face during non-stop 300 plus mile trips..., I am frustrated and far from confident the issue is resolved. I do think there is a parasitic draw but pulling each fuse one by one and looking for voltage changes revealed only BCM modules affecting it and it wasn’t much.

Im going to get back on the road armed with a spare new battery, charger, tester, and long jumper cables while hoping I may have solved the problem. Regardless, this will be my last new GM. As I mentionEd before, I had a major electrical issue with my last new GM vehicle that cost me $3000 at the dealer when it left my wife stranded on a long trip. It was clearly a lack of quality control issue that time. Jury is still out on this problem but it sure walks like a duck...

Again, both vehicles had no forewarning DOA stranded issues at less than 4 years old and less than 45,000 miles.

By the way, what have you experienced as a normal state of charge after the truck sits for 24 hours?
 

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I really can't answer typical SOC because normally I park my truck to a week or weeks at a time (I have a company ride). This being said, it's in the garage with a trickle charger on it that holds at 13.55 volts. Sorry I couldn't be of more help on your question.....
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 · (Edited)
I let the truck sit overnight and it showed a 53% state of charge in the morning. Got in and it fired right up. However, this time the voltage while running in a 6 mile drive stayed between 12.0 and 12.2. It was mostly fluctuating between 12.1 and 12.2. It didn’t get to 12.0 until it was close to the 6 mile stopping point. I stopped, turned it off for about 10 minutes and took it for another run. Same status, stayed between 12.1 and 12.2. However, I read SFL‘s post on another site about how putting it into tow/haul mode forces it charge. Within 1/8 of a mile the voltage jumped up staying between 13.0 and 14.8. I ran a few miles and turned off tow / haul and the voltage stayed up for a while and then settled back to 12.0 to 12.2. I repeated this process a few times and had the same results over and over. I did a lot of deliberate coasting and braking and when not in tow / haul mode it made no difference.

I also saw the post about the battery current / Hall effect sensor sending information to the BCM. I did not find this part listed. Does anyone know if it is included in the negative battery cable assembly?

I also know the BCM plays a role in determining charging. It isn’t very expensive but I believe it must be programmed at the dealer. Anyone know that for certain?

I know this is throwing parts at a problem. But, at $150 plus per hour at the dealer, I don’t mind throwing a couple hundred dollars of parts at it. And, I learn in the process.

I have a new alternator on hand it cost just about what an hour at the dealer would cost. I am thinking about throwing that part at the problem just to rule it out. I swapped in another battery at no real cost so I believe I can rule out the battery as the problem.

Another point of interest... I purchased the GDE engine tunes (intact and delete) before they had to stop the non-EPA stuff. I did not install it because I know it would void the warranty. I got cold feet. Frankly, I just want a reliable truck. I am planning to reconsider when the warranty expires. I seem to recall the GDE tune changed the charging parameters to help keep the battery at a higher state of charge. Anyone know for sure?
 

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I let the truck sit overnight and it showed a 53% state of charge in the morning. Got in and it fired right up. However, this time the voltage while running in a 6 mile drive stayed between 12.0 and 12.2. It was mostly fluctuating between 12.1 and 12.2. It didn’t get to 12.0 until it was close to the 6 mile stopping point. I stopped, turned it off for about 10 minutes and took it for another run. Same status, stayed between 12.1 and 12.2. However, I read SFL‘s post on another site about how putting it into tow/haul mode forces it charge. Within 1/8 of a mile the voltage jumped up staying between 13.0 and 14.8. I ran a few miles and turned off tow / haul and the voltage stayed up for a while and then settled back to 12.0 to 12.2. I repeated this process a few times and had the same results over and over. I did a lot of deliberate coasting and braking and when not in tow / haul mode it made no difference.

I also saw the post about the battery current / Hall effect sensor sending information to the BCM. I did not find this part listed. Does anyone know if it is included in the negative battery cable assembly?

I also know the BCM plays a role in determining charging. It isn’t very expensive but I believe it must be programmed at the dealer. Anyone know that for certain?

I know this is throwing parts at a problem. But, at $150 plus per hour at the dealer, I don’t mind throwing a couple hundred dollars of parts at it. And, I learn in the process.

I have a new alternator on hand it cost just about what an hour at the dealer would cost. I am thinking about throwing that part at the problem just to rule it out. I swapped in another battery at no real cost so I believe I can rule out the battery as the problem.

Another point of interest... I purchased the GDE engine tunes (intact and delete) before they had to stop the non-EPA stuff. I did not install it because I know it would void the warranty. I got cold feet. Frankly, I just want a reliable truck. I am planning to reconsider when the warranty expires. I seem to recall the GDE tune changed the charging parameters to help keep the battery at a higher state of charge. Anyone know for sure?
The BCM monitors the battery voltage and based on time and current draw that GM has programmed in the algorithm it tells the ECM how much to charge the battery. It does this by changing the PWM signal to the regulator in the alternator. If the tow-haul switch brings up the voltage then the alternator is functioning properly.


Try this, put the DIC on voltage, turn on the headlights after you start the truck. It takes about 1 to 2 minutes but when not decelerating you should see the voltage go up to 13.8 volts not instantly it roams upward but once reached it will stay there. When your decelerating it will jump up into the 14.5 range + or - a few tenths.

The first thing I do every time I get in my truck is turn the headlights on because I can't stand the BS charging all in the name of trying to squeeze .1 MPG at the cost of early battery death.

There are a few things that will up the charging voltage Towhaul, headlights (not daytime running you have to actually manually turn on the lights) blower speed on high, wipers turned on (this one I haven't tested). All of these take a few minutes to go into effect it's not an instant thing. The only thing that happens fairly quickly is a bump in voltage on a deceleration. GM is trying to force feed the battery using the kinetic energy of the vehicle while slowing down.

Because of the morons at the EPA, all the manufacturers have to get real creative to meet the unrealistic standards. It's fairly stupid, get a tenth of an MPG because that's going to save the planet, but lets toss more lead filled batteries into landfills or backyards because that's the "GREEN" thing to do. But hey, lets not confuse the truth with the facts.

Keep in mind you can't really tell the SOC unless you leave the hood unlatched after you park for the night. In the morning if you open the unlatched hood and put a meter on the battery without touching the doors or using the remote you will get a real feel for the standing voltage of the battery at rest. Using the remote, opening any door, pulling the hood latch all cause the BCM to wake up and turn all kinds of things on skewing a voltage reading......

The GDE tune doesn't change the charging whatsoever.

Try the headlight thing and let me know how it works out for you....
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Thank you, I will try the headlight test. I have read that deleting causes the charge rate to became fixed at 15.3 but GDE changed it to 14.5 with the last version of the delete tune. I will add that to the “pro” side of deleting. Once the “con” of voiding the warranty comes off the list, I feel pretty confident deleting will be the choice. I actually am just fine with the performance of the truck as is (HP and torque is just fine for me) and I like that it is putting less emissions in the environment. But, all the emissions equipment adds so much to the unreliability factor with so much to go wrong, it is just not practical for me. I replaced the diesel particulate sensor a month before this problem popped up. What’s next in the name of fuel economy and emissions? The variable charge system is just something else to go wrong. It would be great to do away with it.

For me, it will be better for the environment if I delete. If I move on from this one, I’m going to buy a pre-emissions diesel truck and totally refurb it. I’m done with unreliable “new” vehicles after this one. A deleted canyon is going to be a lot more environmentally friendly than that.

One of my fun vehicles is an old diesel Land Rover. I could make it run with a 9 volt smoke detector type battery if I had to.
 

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lol... smoke detector battery, bahaha, I hear you.

The thing that sucks is they've made the vehicles so complicated chasing mileage requirements that the techs at the dealerships can't even fix them when they break. Even GM just has the techs just throw parts at it until the problem goes away.

I really like my truck but the emissions stuff worries me when camping, I keep waiting for the hammer to drop while trying to relax camping (kind of defets the purpose). I only have a little under 15K on mine a bunch of it towing and so far not a problem and I hope it stays that way. Weekly my truck sits in the garage because I have a company ride.

The problem with 14.7 all the time though is that's the "absorption" phase voltage of a charging battery. If kept there all the time it will cook the battery and also kill it's life. Short duration's at that level are good but holding a battery at 13.5 to 13.8 will get you the max life and reliability out of the battery.

Oh also I forgot, according to the service manual if you pull the 2-wire connector off the alternator the internal regulator will default to 13.8v or so, in my mind that's a back up plan if you get stuck. Then nothing external will alter the voltage if you were to say have to jump start the vehicle because of a battery issue. Sure it will cause a dash light but at that point who cares.

Sucks to have to give up and go backwards and do a resto mod for simplicity just to have piece of mind.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
I tried the headlight thing today. It did exactly as you described. It didnt give me any trouble starting after several short trips today. However, after one, the DIC voltage was 11.8. My battery analyzer says it’s a great battery... In fairness, before my wife got stranded I’d didn’t pay much attention to this stuff. In February it started turning over a little slow after sitting. That is why I installed a new battery.

On another note, I installed a PML oil pan today that I had purchased some time ago. The good news is there was very little and only fine ”stuff” on the magnet in the pan. The truck now has just under 45,000 miles. Fluid was dark but not bad at all. I didn’t change the filter because it looked great.
 

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My wife is on a solo road trip in our 2017 Canyon with Duramax diesel. I’m an overkill guy for preventive maintenance. I thought the battery was turning over the engine a little slow in February and with the truck and battery being 4 years old I decided to swap out the battery for a new one. Everything was fine until my wife began her solo road trip. She stopped for a bathroom break about 400 miles in. She came back out and the engine turned over maybe one turn and then was done. Right at that point I got the onstar error message via email, “The battery in your 2017 GMC Canyon is critically low. Start your vehicle as soon as possible and let the engine run to charge the battery.”

No error messages were indicated before that in the DIC.

She got a jump start and continued 200 miles to the hotel. After arriving at the hotel it started right up. She called AAA who came out and tested the battery. Here are the results:

I wanted them to replace the battery but they talked my wife out of it. I’m surprised they said nothing about the 66% state of charge.

So, the next morning it started right up. She went to Autozone and asked them to replace the battery. They tested the battery and charging system. Again, they told her everything is normal. All they said is the idle charge was initially low at 12.6 but it popped up to 13.1 quickly. But, as we know, that is likely normal for these computer controlled alternators.They also talked her out of replacing the battery.

She left Autozone with a very nice jump pack.

I explained to her how to check the charge in the DIC. It was up to 14.5 while driving.

With all systems seeming normal, she is back on the road. Im headed out to meet her with a new battery and alternator. I was surprised the new OEM alternator was only $180.

Anyone ever had such a weird occurrence, the battery charge dropping so low with no logical cause? She was driving on the interstate and only left the truck off for about 10 minutes.
Not sure if anyone mentioned this as I'm at work tldr, but there is an issue with the higher idle in the settings menu, whenever I have this selected the battery doesn't charge correctly and dies, every thing else sounds exactly as you said. I do get this odd burning smell from the battery when the voltage changes quickly, time will tell been doing this for a year.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Not sure if anyone mentioned this as I'm at work tldr, but there is an issue with the higher idle in the settings menu, whenever I have this selected the battery doesn't charge correctly and dies, every thing else sounds exactly as you said. I do get this odd burning smell from the battery when the voltage changes quickly, time will tell been doing this for a year.
How do you change that setting? Thanks!
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
On / off topic here... I should probably post this in the towing post.

I decided to throw caution to the wind and drove from eastern NM elevation 9000 feet, to the Lake Tahoe area in northern CA and back. I was pulling an empty trailer there and a loaded trailer on the return trip, (old Land Rover) total weight about 6,600 pounds. Not only did I not have battery / charging issues, the truck performed very well even going up steep and long grades. There was one very steep grade at high elevation around Lake Tahoe where it took everything it had to hold 40 mph. However, it did it and trans temps topped out at 220. On the way back I went up a long and steep grade and hit 222 going from about 4000 to 9000 feet at the end of the trip. It held at 45 mph most of the way up but I slowed down near the end when it got to 222. Trans temp dropped to 221 when I slowed to 35.

So, on the charging issue, I was in tow / haul mode the entire trip so I know the issue doesn’t occur in tow / haul mode.

Also, I highly recommend the drive on 395, absolutely beautiful!

Also, be careful with your speed pulling a trailer in CA. 55 mph limit... exceed it and meet a chp trooper...I did! Written warning, no harm no foul.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 · (Edited)
Settings-vehicle-climate-elevated idle- off- hope this works out for you the way it did for me. Original battery for 2017. Will prob be upgrading to a bigger one here soon.
j
I can’t even find “settings” in the driver information center. 😕

EDIT.... I found it. Thanks!

However, neither option was checked. I selected ”OFF”

Just to confirm, setting yours to “OFF” seemed to solve the problem?
 

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Oh lordiee lol....
Yes, setting mine to off solved the issue, although I believe the battery damage was already done. I read somewhere they didn't program the computer correctly it's like a glitch. And I noticed a few weeks after I selected this the issues began. The only other thing I swapped out was a 200 amp midi fuse.
 
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